Sky Kim

Skp 091
                                                                         

 

Sky Kim lives and works in the New York City area. Born in Seoul, Korea and she received a M.F.A in Painting from Pratt Institute. She is a recipient of the National Museum of Contemporary Art’s National Korean Art Competition Awards and a Pratt Institute Art Grant. She has exhibited in major venues around the world and has been exhibiting and lecturing as a guest artist at universities, including University of Nevada in NV, Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania and St. Joseph’s University in PA. 

Education

Pratt Institute; Brooklyn, N.Y
Master of Fine Arts in Painting (Graduated with Honors)

 

Context-Art Miami

Diana Copperwhite Vienna Shadow Lr
Diana Copperwhite “Vienna Shadow” oil on canvas, 180 x 170 cm 2018

Press Release

The CONTEXT Art Miami Pavilion / Stand C218
One Herald Plaza @ NE 14th Street | Downtown Miami 
On Biscayne Bay between the Venetian & MacArthur Causeways

VIP PREVIEW: Tuesday, December 4th 5:30 -10pm
Access for CONTEXT, Art Miami & Aqua VIP Cardholders, Art Basel Miami Beach VIP Cardholders, Design Miami VIP Cardholders, Untitled VIP Cardholders, NADA VIP Cardholders, & Press. Sponsored by Christie’s International Real Estate and Benefiting the Perez Art Museum Miami.

General Admission:
December 5th – 8th, 11am – 8pm
December 9th,  11am – 6pm

John Parks: “Putti” November 15th to December 22, 2018.

 

Albumtemp (1)

John Alexander Parks 
Putti
November 15 – December 22, 2018.

Please note that during Art Basel Miami December 4-9, the gallery will only open by appointment,  We are returning to normal opening hours on after Dec 11th.

                                                                                                                                               

Indefatigable New York/British painter John A. Parks, takes on the subject of putti, those mysteriously animated infants who show up in so many classical paintings. Aping and often exaggerating adult behavior, they reflect the complexities of human interaction in ways that can be both charming and frightening.  Parks paints them fighting, whispering, frolicking, dancing and flying as he explores and exploits their curious existence.  Part artistic convention  and part real children, his putti offer a tool for the painter’s imagination, a vehicle with which he can make explicit the powerful forces of attraction, deceit and violence while presenting them in a form that is often beguilingly playful. Parks has also used putti to substitute for the traditional classical figures of the constellations, filling the night sky with combinations of putti interacting in all manner of improbable ways. While many of his paintings are executed in a straightforward oil technique he has also explored heavier surfaces in some of them, creating powerful sgraffito drawing scored through layers of thick acrylic paste, and then building paintings richly soaked in color on this heavily textured surface. These works take on some of the authority and curiosity of ancient mural cycles, brought up to date with an edgy touch, fine drawing and a sparkling imagination. 

John A. Parks (1952 ) was born and educated in England earning a masters degree in painting from the Royal College of Art, London.  He has lived in New York since the late seventies and exhibited his work for many years with the Allan Stone Gallery. While his early work was realist in nature his later work has explored a variety of avenues in representational painting.  He is a member of the faculty of the School of Visual Arts, New York.

Gustavo Acosta, Julie Langsam, Armando Marino at Lehman Gallery October 13, 2018 – January 26, 2019


Fantasy Architecture in Contemporary Art
October 13, 2018 – January 26, 2019

The buildings in our mind’s eye are limitless.

In our dreams, we unlock doors to unknown passages and climb unending stairs into the darkness of rooms, strange and never seen before.  Not tied to the reality of bricks and mortar or ground and gravity, we imagine any structure ― the American “dream home” on a coveted suburban cul-de-sac beyond our reach, or the wild acid-trip floating balloon palace of a magical unicorn.

Jarring the laws of actual architecture, the imagined palace functions as very real foundation, buttress, and pillar for Castles in the Sky. From Claes Oldenburg’s proposal to replace the Washington Monument with a gigantic scissors to Laurie Simmons’ photograph of candy castles atop a cake weathering a blizzard of confectionary “snow,” the 30 artists in Castles in the Sky develop bizarre, impractical, enchanting, and inspiring unbuilt (and likely unbuildable) designs, and gather inspiration from famous sources.

Lother Osterberg draws from the etchings of 18th-century Italian artist Giovanni Battista Piranesi, the creator of images of dark and cavernous space― the nightmarish side of the architectural dream. Will Cotton’s candy castle represents a fantastical continuum of the art of 19th-century American landscape painter Thomas Cole, who, in Youth (1842), pictures a man rushing towards the mirage of a castle in the sky, the locus of all his youthful dreams. In Salvador Dali’s Gala’s Castle (1974) an elephant on attenuated legs tiptoes across a castle crenellation in Surrealist activity, which we spy, again, today, in Adrien Broom’s improbable scene of a Victorian woman standing in her drawing room open to the sky and filled with a wandering zebra.

This exhibition plays tribute to the ceaseless meanderings of the human imagination and the creative fantasy the hovers in the recesses of every artist’s mind.

The exhibition is organized by the Lehman College Art Gallery.

Exhibition Program Supporters:
New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; New York City Council through the Honorable Andrew Cohen and the Bronx Delegation; Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; Charina Foundation; Jarvis and Constance Doctorow Family Foundation; Medora and John Geary Family Fund; Edith and Herbert Lehman Foundation; and the New Yankee Stadium Community Benefits Fund.

 

 

Lifeline as Medium: Recent Works by Arghavan Khosravi and Cecilia Charlton

 
Lifeline as Medium: Recent Works by Arghavan Khosravi and Cecilia Charlton 

October 18 – November 13, 2018

 
In Lifeline as Medium, Thomas Jaeckel Gallery showcases two bodies of recent work from Iranian-born painter Arghavan Khosravi and American artist Cecilia Charlton. Both artists’ creations convey a strong sense of the ancient in dialogue with the contemporary; each uses an inventive combination of diverse mediums, both traditional and modern; and both work with compelling imagery that demands the viewer’s participation to reveal hidden meanings and elusive narratives that are only hinted at by surface appearances. The works on display are the product of two lives lived under the influence of a vast and varied range of past experiences, as well as a strong commitment to discovering a new life for traditional art and craft processes within the realm of contemporary art. A dual portrait emerges of two artists striving — each in her own unique way — to make us question where we’ve been and where we’re going.

Carlos Rodriguez Cardenas: Geographical Mind in the Architecture of Landscape

                                                                                                                                                   
Carlos Rodríguez Cárdenas

Geographical Mind in the Architecture of Landscape 

September 13 – October 13, 2018

Jaeckel Gallery is pleased to present Geographical Mind in the Architecture of Landscape, an exhibition of recent works by Carlos Rodríguez Cárdenas. In his native Cuba during the 1980s, Carlos Rodríguez Cárdenas developed an influential style of painting that deployed irony, sly humor, and a shrewd parody of High-Modernist sophistication to mock the conceits of official state-sponsored imagery and utopian sloganeering. In Geographical Mind in the Architecture of Landscape Cárdenas turns a discerning eye toward the United States, delivering a body of work that seems at first glance like a love letter to the American landscape and to the modern city—New York being his adopted home of many years now—yet gradually reveals an undercurrent of wariness and disquiet about our national myths and pretensions. Alongside this is an extended meditation on his own migrations, and on the endless tension between the fundamental human desire for stability and the inevitability of flux in our lives.

References to monumental constructions, modern technology, and utopian aspirations have always been a cornerstone of Cárdenas’s visual language. In these works, he uses such imagery to powerful effect, juxtaposing bold, semi-abstracted renditions of cityscapes and sea vessels with picturesque antique views of landmark buildings and collaged insets from maps of the U.S. and other countries; the combination evokes the grand narratives of progress and power that have always informed this country’s collective self-image, yet also makes these stories seem quaint, or even wistfully naive. The centerpiece of the show (The Journey, 2007-2018) is a frieze-like row of paintings with a squarely frontal view of tiny stylized skyscrapers and ships perched atop a massive wall of gargantuan bricks and gloomily featureless towers. The effect is something like the monotonous terrain of an old-school side-scrolling video game, suggesting perpetual travel with neither rest nor peace. Yet the varied light-blue shades of the bricks suggest expanses of open sky and sea, hinting at the possibility of freedom and escape from the strictures of law and dogma. The Bunker (2015) hints at similar notions via a pentaptych depicting a gargantuan seaborne ark/metropolis, while Geographical Mind  (2018) combines a clock face, compass points, and small circular insets from road maps of the U.S., Cuba, and Mexico, referencing the age-old human drive to dominate nature’s unruliness (and our own) with artificially imposed systems and structures.

Cárdenas understands classic visual metaphors for our cities and landscapes well, and he quotes them to great effect. His minimal, stylized buildings are strongly reminiscent of works by other artists we associate with New York in its modernist heyday, ranging from the Precisionist Charles Sheeler and Charles Demuth to Georgia O’Keefe and even Joseph Cornell. Small rectangular patches in the diptych American Landscape (2015) recall the vast, clear skies in Ed Ruscha’s Hollywood and Standard Station paintings and the grand-scale mythologizing of the American landscape of the Hudson River School painters. The evocation of these great Modernist chroniclers of the American myth adds a poignant twinge to Cárdenas’s status as the perpetual outsider looking in.

His works are included in such major collections as the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York; the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston; the Museum of Art in Fort Lauderdale, Florida; the Museum Ludwig in CologneGermany; and Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de La Habana in Havana.

For further information, please contact Jaeckel Gallery by phone at 1.917.701.3338, or by e-mail at info@532gallery.com

Group Show – Hell’s Kitchen

 
JULY 16 – OCTOBER 16, 2018
HELL’S KITCHEN 

Diana Copperwhite, Ian Hughes, Danny Rolph, Gustavo Acosta, Jose Vincench, Rime

In her paintings, Diana Copperwhite plays with rich layers of light and color in a conceptual exploration of memory and abstraction. She creates a new fluid visual quality of dreamlike and transitory images.

Danny Rolph’s compositions construct their grammar of signs through material engagement and unprincipled investigations into the history of the ‘pictorial’.

Gustavo Acosta creates intensely hued portrayals of urban and natural landscapes, with rectilinear overlays of colors that integrate allusions to the ideal planned-city street grid, sharp-edged Bauhaus aesthetic, and small flashes of vitality and inspiration.

Ian Hughes’s canvases engage in a game of illusions and naturalistic forms shape-shifting on top of a flat color-space, searching for a linkage between brain and viscera, forming a kind of connective tissue with the viewer.

Jose Vincench uses the most socially valuable and significant of materials to make expressive assertions, as an abstract artist and autonomous individual in subliminal defiance of a materialistic society.

RIME finds himself engaged in a performative process — his energetic movements comprise traces of the iconographic, cartoon-styled figures, ribbons of color and light filter, flawless brushtrokes.

Biographies of the artists can be found at the gallery website. The exhibition opens July 16 and will be on view through October 16, 2018 . For more information, please contact the gallery at info@532gallery.com or visit www.532gallery.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

                            

Station Museum Examines Asian American Identity in Latest Exhibition

Station Museum Examines Asian American Identity in Latest Exhibition

…and still we banter with the Devil, 2017, oil, silk, acrylic, antique 24k gold leaf obi thread, 19th century American cotton on canvas, 72″ x 96″

Lien Truong calls her recent works “a frenetic amalgamation of western and Asian painting techniques and philosophies.” The artist’s choice of materials—oils, silk, thread, cotton, acrylics, and antique 24k gold-leaf obi thread—create an absorbing cacophony of culture and honed skills. The series “Mutiny in the Garden,” in particular, take on varying and converging histories.

“The act of manipulating pigment over a support instantaneously embraces centuries of historical drawing and painting, art made integral with religious principles and cultural ideologies,” the artist says, in a statement. “I am at once undeniably seduced by the sensation and process of pushing material over a surface and at the same time curiously fixated on the present-day relevance and discoveries of these primordial acts. For me, the advancement of art and culture are parallel. Creating art becomes an illuminating act, one undertaken to understand contemporary doctrines by the study of evolving sentiments.”

Susana Guerrero: MACC – FIRST EDITION OF PROJECTS

Susana Guerrero:
PULLS AND RETURNS. 

The MACC exhibits the projects for its first four monumental works, which will be traveling along the Camino de Santiago.

 Impulses and returns is a sculptural project linked to works that Susana Guerrero has been doing in recent years, which display relationships between autopsies, anatomies, deities and classical myths, traditions and popular superstitions.

Susana3 Proyectos Macc
Sculpture in iron and marble measuring 350 x 500 x 1600 cm.

DANNY ROLPH: “WCW”

Danny Rolph
WCW
May 10 – June 21, 2018

 

PRESS RELEASE

532 Gallery is pleased to announce WCW, an exhibition of new paintings by London-based artist Danny Rolph.  This is the artist’s second solo show with the gallery.

Rolph’s exhibition of a new body of work made over the last year showcases the artist’s signature Triplewall paintings.  A continuation of his visually impactful paintings, these new works reflect his evolving exploration of high velocity color and layered narratives.  The compositional potential of his painting strategies on Triplewall plastic allow the viewer’s senses to be fully engaged. The paintings are layered and emotive, combining paint, drawings and collage with art historical and Pop Art references.

In the “WCW” painting, there are heraldic motifs and the drawing of a cowboy hat near the top.  Two large floaty irregular cylindrical “shapes”, one outlined and one purple and white, billow across the surface like curtains.  Across the bottom there is a design-like twisted shape in the middle in purple/gray.  Along the bottom two larger areas of yellow bracket a pink rectangle that hangs on bronze strings like a banner without a name.  The composition regains a sort of architectural order with turquoise and pink lines near the center of the painting.  There are many fragments of colors and lens like shapes throughout the painting. 

The exhibition’s title WCW is in homage to the American Modernist poet William Carlos Williams whose work the artist has long admired and is evident in the titles chosen such as “red wheelbarrow”.  The poet’s friend, Kenneth Burke, said that poetry is “equipment for living, a necessary guide amid the bewilderments of life”.  Rolph’s new paintings are built around and above model airplane instructions that work as a backdrop for his sharp, delicate, painterly and emotive compositions.  The idea of creating and exploration is thus embedded in the background, and serves as a metaphor for the artist’s studio. 

Looping painted lines of color, purple, teal and blue among them, float above as navigational devices.  Prints, watercolors and drawings jostle for attention around all of Rolph’s compositions.  The work throughout the exhibition is a visual equivalent of a poem.

Rolph has an MA in painting from the Royal College of Art, London and was the Rome Scholarship at the British School at Rome. His recent solo exhibitions include ‘Painted on the sky’, Barbara Davis Gallery, Houston; ‘Recollection’, 532 Gallery; ‘Atelier’, E.S.A.D. Valence, France; ‘kissing balloons in the jungle’, Poppy Sebire gallery, London; ‘ten minutes from now’, Eden Rock Gallery, St.Barths.  His work is represented in many international collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and the Tate Gallery, London.

For more information, please contact the gallery at info@532gallery.com

                                       

Rime | Code

RIME: CODE

April 5 – May 6, 2018

532 Gallery is pleased to announce CODE, an exhibition of new paintings by RIME.  

RIME’s studio work has frequently stripped out, isolated, reworked, and repositioned component features of his most elaborate graffiti pieces.  His large bodily gestures of swooping letter serifs become expertly painted in studio, not street, media.  The cartoon heraldic b-boys, mugs, and pinups guide the eye or float in giant fight clouds.  The new works in CODE deconstruct the cartoonish figures to hints of them: a chin, an ear, a nose.  The contour of furrowed foreheads implying consternation or surprise, a finger or two giving direction.  A leg, a breast, a bum.  A flowing hairstyle.  They dance together to implied music. In something of a RIME tradition, where one or two eyes won’t do, an even-numbered row of eyeballs lines up.  They might be breasts, too – this could go either way.  The deconstructed figures bear at times deconstructed apparel and accessories: jewelry – the classic gold rope chain – and the suggestion of a Kangol or Borsalino hat.  And RIME’s own body appears as well, reflected in the swooping gestures both as serigraph-flat arcs and painterly brushstrokes.

RIME had always been pro-organic, anti-artificial, in his work.  You could see it in the graffiti: the sacred radius of the swing of the arm, the full dip in the knees and waist to a crouch.  The ratio of the body to the work is absolutely essential in graffiti: it’s how the human meets the inanimate wall and scales itself to it.  Never to measure, never to tape off, instead to use the sacred geometry of the body, of the confidence of style, of the moment, to divine proportions.  But in a recent DMT experience RIME encountered a sense of how technologically coded our minds and existence are.  He experienced what felt like an artificial, full color, three-dimensional program.  He reconsidered the notion that this life, the universe, and consciousness was of organic origin.  He felt the ones and zeros, the perfection of right angles, the grid structure undergirding the cosmos, and he began to work with what he had once closed off.  The new works in CODE reflect this experience. 

RIME was born in 1979 and grew up in Brooklyn, Staten Island and New Jersey.  By the mid-1990s, he had emerged as one of the most passionate and dedicated graffiti writers of his generation, and in the twenty-seven-plus years since then, he has become one of graffiti’s greats.  Drawing on an extensive knowledge of graffiti’s history of lettering styles and techniques, he has a visual vocabulary and versatility with letters nearly unparalleled worldwide and has held his own on walls with the best of the best. 

Review >>  White Hot Magazine April 2018

RRime Artist Talk (Vimeo)

Read More about Rime –>

 

Carlos Rodríguez Cárdenas

carlos rodríguez cárdenas

Tree of Life (Arbol de la Vida), 2018, acrylic on linen, atlas map collage,  28″ x 28″

Carlos Rodríguez Cárdenas, born in 1962 in Santi Spiritus, Villa Clara, is one of the important Cuban artists who came to contemporary art spotlight in the mid-1980’s.  Since that time, his exile in Mexico in the early 1990s and settling in New York, his work has been known for its exquisite and ironic artistry, inviting the viewer to question reality and see beyond the world of the official word imposed by the system.

In his most recent work, Cárdenas rekindles the nature and landscape of New York and depicts the megalopolis in a more sobering new order with a balance of Cartesian-like geometries. His pictorial conventions are characterized by subtle counterpoints, mysticism and rationality, the yin and yang of the natural and urban environment.

Cárdenas is in major collections, including Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Peter Ludwig Museum, Cologne, Germany; Ludwig Forum for International Art, Aachen, Germany; Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale; Museo Provincial de Santa Clara, Villa Clara; and National Museum of Fine Arts Havana, Cuba — as well as many private collections.  He has exhibited internationally, including solo exhibitions at GE Galeria, Mexico; Galeria Nina Menocal, Mexico; Galeria Ramis F. Barquet, Madrid, Spain; Fredric Snitzer Gallery, Coral Gables; and ARCO 93 International Art Fair, Madrid.  Group shows in which he has been featured include the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Perez Art Museum, Miami; 1989 Havana Biennial; Stadtische Kunsthalle,Dusseldorf, Germany; Centro Atlantico de Arte Moderno, Las Plasmas de Gran Canaria, Spain; and Samuel P. Hart Museum of Art.  He earned the Collective Prize Cuban Painting, awarded to participate at the First Biennial Jaume Guasch, Barcelona, Spain. Cárdenas completed his arts studies in 1983 in Havana’s Instituto Superior de Arte (ISA), and currently lives and works in New York City. 

Lien Truong

Lien Truong

Lien Troung Mutiny

…and still we banter with the devil, 2017, oil, silk, acrylic, antique 24k gold leaf obi thread, 19th century American cotton on canvas, 72″ x 96″

Lien Truong’s art boldly investigates ideological models of our history and culture.  In her most recent works, she combines the Hudson River Valley School “western” landscape, gestural abstractions, cultural textile designs, and compositions from Asian war prints.  She mixes layers of images and departs from a standard visual experience.  Truong’s landscapes and figures, culled from the historic and recent past, present “narrative histories” through a type of blended painting.  Truong (MFA, Mills College) currently lives and works in North Carolina.  

Truong has exhibited her work at such institutions as the National Portrait Gallery, Washington DC; the Oakland Museum of California; the Weatherspoon Museum; the North Carolina Museum of Art; and the Pennsylvania Academy of Art.  She has participated in artist residencies at the Oakland Museum of California and the Marble House Project and has received reviews and mention in several publications including New American Paintings, ARTit Japan, and Art Asia Pacific.

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS
2018 In(di)visible, Station Museum of Contemporary Art, Houston, TX; Cameron Museum of Art, Wilmington, NC
2017 Translatio Imperii, Gutterbox Gallery, Raleigh, NC
          Digiscapes, Curated by Anthony Hamilton, Lump, Raleigh, NC
          Art on Paper, Curated by Emily Stamey, Weatherspoon Art Museum, Greensboro, NC
          Objectifying Myself: Works by Women Artists from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, William Benton Museum of Art, Storrs, CT
          For Liberty and Justice for Some, Walter Maciel Gallery, Los Angeles, CA
          Shimmer, Light and Design Gallery, Chapel Hill, NC
2016 Seeping of a Ghost, Gallery Bastejs, Riga, Latvia (solo)
          Musings on an Origin, Spectre Arts, Durham, NC Typecast, Hillyer Art Space, Washington, DC
2015 Heterotopias as Other, Nha San Collective, Hanoi, Vietnam (solo)
2014 The Orient, The Occident, Galerie Quynh, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam (solo)
          Summer Shuffle: Contemporary Art @ PAFA Remixed, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts
          The Mother Load, The Center for Creative Connections, Dallas Museum of Art, TX
2013 Contemporary Vietnamerican Art, Maier Museum of Art, Lynchburg, VAThe
          Linda Lee Alter Collection of Art by Women
, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, PA
2012 Alter/Altar: Meditations on the Past, The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation Art Center
          Collisions of Clamor and Calm, Galerie Quynh, HCMC, Vietnam
          Art HK 12, Hong Kong International Art Fair, with Galerie Quynh
2011 Bite Sized Monsters, Modern Eden, San Francisco, CA
2010 Twombly House/Ephemeral Museum, Portland, OR
         Outwin Boochever Portrait Exhibition, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C
2009 Family Pictures, Root Division, San Francisco, CA
2008 In Transition Russia, Municipal Centre for Contemporary Art, Yekaterinburg
          National Centre for Contemporary Arts, Moscow, Russia
2007 House of Adoration, Galerie Quynh Contemporary Art, HCMC, Vietnam (solo)
         House of Adoration, Ryllega Experimental Art Gallery, Hanoi, Vietnam (solo)
         Small Works, Morris Graves Museum of Art, Eureka, CA
2006 Portrait of a Contemporary Family, First Street Gallery, Eureka, CA
           Portrait of a Family, Southern Exposure, San Francisco, CA

           National Juried Exhibition, Marin Art Center, Marin, CA Juror: Rene de Guzman
          Small Works Invitational, Gallery Dog, Eureka, CA
          Out of Context, Huntington Beach Art Center, Huntington Beach, CA
          Face Paint, Bucheon Gallery, San Francisco, CA
2004 Monster Drawing Rally, Southern Exposure, San Francisco, CA
          Supernatural, Southern Exposure, San Francisco, CA
          Go West! Richmond Art Center, Richmond, CA
2003 Modern Day Fairy Tales, Oakland Museum of California, CA (installation)

PUBLIC COLLECTIONS
Weatherspoon Art Museum
North Carolina Museum of Art
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, in the Linda Lee Alter Collection of Art by Women
Post Vidai, Vietnam
Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Vietnam
Municipal Art Collection, City of Raleigh, NC
Humboldt State University

SELECT AWARDS | RESIDENCIES
2016 North Carolina Artist Fellowship, North Carolina Arts Council
          Artist-in-Residence, The Marble House Project, Dorset, Vermont
2015 Jimmy and Judy Cox Asia Initiative Award, Carolina Asia Center
2009 Outwin Boochever Portrait Finalist, National Portrait Gallery, Washington DC
          Ingrid Nickelson Artist Trust Grant
2003 Artist-in-Residence, Sweeney Granite Mountains Research Center, University of California at Riverside, Kelso, CA
         Artist-in-Residence, Oakland Museum of California, Oakland CA
2000 Jack and Gertrude Murphy Fine Arts Fellowship, The San Francisco Foundation, San Francisco, CA

SELECT ARTIST LECTURES
2017 Weatherspoon Art Museum, Greensboro, NC
2016 Mark Rothko International Art Center and Museum, Daugavpils, Latvia
          Lavtian Art Academy, Riga, Latvia
          Marble House Project, Dorset, VT
2015 Ackland Museum of Art, NC
          Nha San Art Collective, Hanoi, Vietnam
2007 Morris Graves Museum of Art, Eureka, CA
          Galerie Quynh, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam                    
2004 Huntington Beach Art Center, Huntington Beach, CA
2004 Southern Exposure, San Francisco, CA
2003 Oakland Museum of California, Oakland, CA

SELECT REVIEWS | CITATIONS
2018             Glentzer, Molly, “…and still we banter with the Devil by Lien Truong,” The Houston Chronicle, March 21, 2018    
2017             Dunne, Susan, “Women Create Art Reflecting Their Lives, Thoughts In Benton Exhibit,” Hartford Courant, April 8, 2017
2016             Vitiello, Chris, “The Most Essential Local Art of 2016 Punched Back at a Disgraceful Year,” Indyweek, December 28, 2016
                     Stamey, Emily. New American Paintings. Issue 124. Boston, MA: The Open Studios Press, June/July, 2016
2014             Luong, Ruben. “Ho Chi Minh City,” Art Asia Pacific. Art Asia Pacific Publishing LLC, July/August 2014
                     Bernstein, Roselyn. “Between Underground and Above,” Guernica/magazine of art and politics, www.guernicamag.com
2012            Cozzolino, Robert, Editor “The Female Gaze, The Linda Lee Alter Collection of Art by Women” Pennsylvania Academy Fine Arts                                                                
2010            Buckner, Clark with Introduction by Helfand, Glen.  “A Year and a Half of Art in San Francisco,” Mission 17 Gallery
                     San Francisco, CA: M17 Books Publishing, 2010
2009             “Outwin Boochever Portrait Exhibition,” National Portrait Gallery Catalog, Smithsonian, Washington DC
2007            Uda, Motoko, “Lien Truong,” ARTit Japan’s Bilingual Art Quarterly, Issue 16, 2007
2005            “Out of Context,” The Huntington Beach Art Center Exhibition Catalogue, CA, 2005
2004            Ellegood,Anne. New American Paintings. Issue 49. Boston, MA: The Open Studios Press, January, 2004
                     Bing, Alison. “Portrait of a Contemporary Family,” The San Francisco Chronicle, www.sfgate.com, March 26, 2004
                     Buckner, Clark. “Portraits of a Family,” Critics Choice Review, The San Francisco Bay Guardian. San Francisco, CA, March 17

RIME

RIME

 

RIME was born in 1979 and grew up in Brooklyn, Staten Island and New Jersey.  By the mid-1990s, he had emerged as one of the most passionate and dedicated graffiti writers of his generation, and in the twenty-seven-plus years since then, he has become one of graffiti’s greats.  Drawing on an extensive knowledge of graffiti’s history of lettering styles and techniques, he has a visual vocabulary and versatility with letters nearly unparalleled worldwide and has held his own on walls with the best of the best.

RIME has a knowledge of and facility with the entire vocabulary of graffiti lettering styles that is nearly unparalleled worldwide. He can paint pieces in what seems to be nearly every style from throughout graffiti’s fifty year history, yet they always feel fresh, not derivative, and always his own.  Brooklyn born, Staten Island raised, and longtime New Jersey resident RIME’s playful, character-filled work is full of color and movement, and from simple to complex, from soft to jagged, he is one of the few who can truly do it all in graffiti. If he can’t, his alter-alter ego, quasi-performance artist JERSEY JOE probably can. 

RIME’s knack as a graffiti writer is much like that of a great jazz musician: he is able to elevate everyone’s level of play with his presence.  At this point in his life, RIME has painted alongside as many of the greats of graffiti as anyone, and he’s brought out the best in them. With a background of such versatility and strong individual performance, RIME moved to California from 2005 to 2013, becoming part of the great Los Angeles crews MSK and AWR.  Culturally, the more laid-back collective attitude was an adjustment: the abrasive, assertive energy that comes with an upbringing in New York City that didn’t always fit in.  But RIME was more active than ever, with the weather making for a pleasurable year-round experience.   

When it came to studio work, the dynamic was very different. While he had made works on canvas before, he felt at something of a dead end, and RIME wanted to go back to basics before moving forward again.  In great demand to paint and appear at graffiti events, where he would endlessly sign fans’ black books, RIME originally focused on what was portable and familiar, working on paper and finding the direction he wanted to pursue.  After resettling back in New York in 2013, he set up a formal studio practice for the first time, cut far back on travel, and focused his energies deeply into new bodies of studio work while still actively painting outdoors. 

RIME’s new studio works are dynamic, with the swoops and loops that he had perfected in graffiti with a combination of spray paint and sublime muscle memory and bodily control able to convey an emotional emphasis.  His signature cartoon characters peek out from the bends of these swoops, often reduced to suggestive figurative elements.  The color schemes of his outdoor pieces, were, like any graffiti writer, made with whatever happened to be in the bag of paint that day, far out in the field, and often that meant wild pieces with dozens of colors.  Yet his studio works pared these schemes down to a few well-chosen colors that played brilliantly together.  Like his graffiti pieces, RIME’s studio works are composed in a format meant to be read: figurative images are often presented in profile or in action, carrying a sequential order through the image, an algebra of image, phrase, and meaning.  

RIME had always been pro-organic, anti-artificial, in his work.  You could see it in the graffiti: the sacred radius of the swing of the arm, the full dip in the knees and waist to a crouch.  Never to measure, never to tape off, instead to use the sacred geometry of the body, of the confidence of style, of the moment, to divine proportions.  But in a recent DMT experience he encountered a sense of how technologically coded our minds and existence are. He experienced what felt like an artificial, full color, three-dimensional program.  He reconsidered the notion that this life, the universe, and consciousness was of organic origin. He felt the ones and zeros, the perfection of right angles, the grid structure undergirding the cosmos, and he began to work with what he had once closed off. 

 

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS

2017  Up on Through, Galerie Wallworks, Paris

2016  Conclusions, Jonathan LeVine Gallery, New York

2015  Danger Zone, Galerie Wallworks

2014  Reaction Lines, Galerie Wallworks

2013  Out With The Old, Library Street Collective, Detroit

           TWFSL, The Seventh Letter Gallery, Los Angeles

2012  Sketchy M@#%herfuckers [with KC], Known Gallery, Los Angeles

           Dangerous Drawings About New York [with Toper], Klughaus Gallery, New York

2011  Perseverance [with Roid and Revok], Known Gallery, Los Angeles

           Mural for Art in the Streets, MoCA, Los Angeles

2008  Will Rise, Robert Burman Gallery, Los Angeles

2006  Letters First [with The Seventh Letter], Tokyo and Taipei

2004  Application, Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts, Perth, Australia

 

SELECTED PRESS

Rime at Gallery Thomas Jaeckel, by  Jeffrey Grunthaner, White Hot Magazine April 2018

Per Adolfsen

per adolfsen

Transparent II, 2017, oil on canvas, 47″ x 31″, 120 x 80 cm

Per Adolfsen lives and works in Odense, Denmark, where he was born in 1964.  His earlier work comprised emotionally charged acrylic paintings that seamlessly merge representational and abstraction and text, and engaged the viewer in a seductive world of fantasy and uncertainty that recalls classic Scandinavian angst.  His most recent contemplative oil paintings, a marked break with his prior series, demonstrates his evolving commitment to using the medium as tool for breaking past stereotype and false exteriors in order to know other people and one’s self.  The neutral palette and minimal backgrounds in many pieces allow the viewer to be fully focused on the people foregrounded in the paintings and punctuated by moments of brilliant color—a lavender head scarf, crystalline blue eyes.  Adolfsen’s recent portraiture points the way toward an ethical vision by seeking to represent the colorful bonds that tie people together. 

 

Select Solo Exhibitions  

2018       “The Ribbons That Tie Us”, 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel, New York

2013       ”Goodbye Blue sky”,  Schuebbe Projects , Düsseldorf 

2011       ”The Imaginary Eden of Mr. Adolfsen”, Art Labor Gallery, Shanghai

2011       ”Lifewire”, Schuebbe Projects, Düsseldorf 

2010       ”The world is floating”, 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel, Chelsea, New York 

Select Group Exhibitions

2018.       “Ten Years After” 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel , New York

2017        “Ecco Homo Ecco Homo”  St Canscius Kirche Berlin, Curated by A. Ochs,  Berlin

2016         Frederikshavn Kunstmuseum, “Another Land” Frederikshavn

2016         “50×50” Kastrupgaardsamlingen, Copenhagen

2016         Galleri Kirk,Groupshow , Eske Kath,Kasper Eistrup,Mie Olise Kjærgaard , Ålborg

2016          Art Labor Gallery,, artists of the gallery , Shanghai

2015.        Kunsthal Nord, Selection of works from Ålborg Kommune collection, Ålborg

2015        “Menneske”,with Svend Engelund, Agnete Bjerre, Kirsa Andreasen Birgitte                 

                 Støvring, Kristan Devantier, Camilla Thorup, Kunstbygningen Vrå (October, 2015) 

2015        ”Drei Räume, drei Künstler”, with Miriam Vlaming og  Lu Song, Alexander Ochs Private, Berlin

2014        Dialogues with the collection” Kunstbygningen i Vrå, Engelund Samlingen                

2014        ”Fatal”, with.Tanja Selzer, Nandor Anstenberger, Miriam Vlaming,                            

              Kunsthaus Bethanien (Curated by Art Historian Heike Fuhlbrügge) Berlin

2013         ”Thank God I`m Pretty”, with Frederik Foert, Andreas Amrhein , Vanessa von 

                 Heydebreck, Alexander Ochs Galleries, Berlin                 

2013         ”Septemberudstillingen”, Fanø Kunstmuseum          

2013         ”Medley”, Udstilling Focus on drawing with Franz Burkhardt, Christian Schoeler

                 Yokako Ando, Piot Brehmer, Schüebbe Projects, Düsseldorf               

2012         ”Springshow”, 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel, Chelsea, New York                  

2012         ”Landscapes”,  Schuebbe Projects, Düsseldorf 

2011         ”High Five” with Lu Yang, Douglas Coupland, Eric Leleu, Ren Zhitian, Art Labor   

                 Gallery, Shanghai                

2011          “Ode on Melancholy” with Tom Anholt, Marco Reichert , Marcy Brafman, Janine  

                 Bean Gallery, Berlin              

2010         ”Second Impressions”, Art Labor Gallery, Shanghai            

RECENT PRESS
                 Review ”Berliner Zeitung” 2013 

                  Review ”Art Info” Berlin 2013, by Alexander Forbes 

                  Kunst i øjet, DK4, 2011 (Danish television –artist portrait)

                  Portrait/article ”Glasschord art and Culture Magazine New York” 2011 

                  Review  ”Randian online magazine”, China 2011, by Jennifer Hall 

                  Portrait on Danmarks Radio P1, 2010 

                  Review ”Art Magazine M, The New York Art World” 2010, M. Brendon Macinnis 

 

Per Adolfsen: The Ribbons That Tie Us

 

Per Adolfsen
The Ribbons That Tie Us
March 1 – 31, 2018

532 Gallery is pleased to present our second solo exhibition with Danish painter Per Adolfsen. An exhibition of figurative works and portraiture from 2014 to the present The Ribbons That Tie Us showcases the artist’s sensitive rendering of his subjects’ inner lives. A marked break with his previous emotionally charged acrylic paintings that merged representation, abstraction, and text (exhibited at 532 Gallery Jaeckel in 2010), the contemplative oil paintings in The Ribbons That Tie Us demonstrate the artist’s evolving and deepening commitment to breaking past stereotype and false exteriors in order to truly know other people. The neutral palette and minimal backgrounds in many of his paintings allow the viewer to be fully present with the people foregrounded in them who are punctuated by moments of brilliant color—a lavender head scarf, crystalline blue eyes.

Transparent (2017)

In his Transparent series, Adolfsen abandons the superficial cliché as a starting point and instead looks deeply to reveal the multifaceted psyche of his sitter, a fellow artist friend. Transparent II is bathed in an invigorating pale blue haze that permeates the woman’s skin and clothing. The border between her body and the background blurs at times. Is she in a state of dissipation or becoming? Regardless, she stands unperturbed: shoulders square with the viewer, lips cocked in a confident smirk. Not the mere object of a consuming gaze, the woman in Transparent II asserts her own agency by looking back at the viewer. Transparent III shows the same woman slightly larger than life. Once again meeting the viewer’s gaze with blue-green eyes—whose lids are described in sharp orange lines with the geometric structure of Cézanne’s graphite portraits—she appears relaxed, yet strong.

Transparent I reveals a different facet of Adolfsen’s artist friend, and by doing so gives the viewer a fuller picture of her. A powerful warm light threatens to overwhelm the figure—her skin and yellow camisole almost lost in the blinding glow of the background—yet her eyes securely anchor her in space and bind her to the viewer even while a series of quick, repetitive diagonal strokes describing her hair bely an inner anxiety.

Hibba (2016)

Adolfsen’s series of portraits of his Danish-Muslim friend Hibba are the apogee of his journey into empathic, deep looking. In Hibba I we see the bold contour of Hibba’s dignified profile against a background of alabastrine white whose light infuses the composition with warm energy. Brushmarks delicately sitting on the surface of the canvas attentively describe Hibba’s eyes, eyebrows, lips; her self-assured expression and her gaze are simultaneously introspective and assertive. As in all four portraits of Hibba, cascading lines follow the folds of her lavender hijab, which Adolfsen renders beautiful without exoticizing.

In the Hibba series, as in the Transparent series, Adolfsen’s multiple portraits work in concert to reveal a fully dimensional personality. In Hibba II and Hibba III, Hibba looks out at the viewer with disarming humor. She seems to say, “I caught you looking at me. Well, I can look back at you, too!” In Hibba IV she retracts her gaze, and playfully rolls her eyes. Rather than rendering her the passive object of the artist’s gaze, Adolfsen has opened a space where Hibba asserts her own agency.

In contemporary North America and Europe countless phobic and stereotypical images portray Muslim women as either cold and threatening or as helpless and oppressed. (In canonical Western painting Muslim women have been largely invisible, save for their exoticization in nineteenth-century “Orientalist” works.) At other times today, the Muslim woman becomes a political icon, as in Shepard Fairey’s We the People posters (2017), one of which features Queens resident Munira Ahmed wearing a United States flag as hijab. Adolfsen’s Hibba overcomes both extremes: stereotype and icon. By looking and looking again, he is able to truly see Hibba and know who she is outside of any political rhetoric, which in the present climate is paradoxically an implicit political act.

Clichés (2014)

In 2014 Adolfsen painted a series exploring clichéd images of femininity. The most sophisticated works in this series occupy an ambivalent territory: on the one hand they investigate the flattening effects of stereotypes, which he imports from both the weighty tradition of Western figurative painting and contemporary advertising; but on the other hand, they begin to dismantle stereotypical roles and gazes by revealing an emerging agency in their female subjects.

In a pose that could have been appropriated from a cosmetics or facial cleanser advertisement, the poised figure in profile in Spanish Woman looms monumental. The side of her face, cast in cool maroon shadow, deflects the viewer’s gaze forcing it to ricochet among the patterns of painted parallel streaks composing her face and the background. Lubricious painterly lines fluidly slide along the figure in Berlin Woman who stares at the viewer with an intensity that recalls the paintings of Die Brücke. Her nakedness and closed body language suggest vulnerability and guardedness; her clenched fist indicates a latent ferocity. The pose is one that could have been taken from any number of titillating, sexy advertisements, but the figure’s psychological intensity—reinforced by the fiery orange shadows around the eyes—and the androgynous queering of gender defy prepackaged commercial messaging.

The Ribbons That Tie Us (2016)

The exhibition’s title The Ribbons That Tie Us refers to a homonymous series of still lifes included in the show, in which painted bands of ribbon glide back and forth across the surface of the canvas like dancers entering and exiting a stage. In one, orange ribbons occasionally twist and turn abruptly, like leaps and pauses in the choreography. The warmth of this painting’s color and the energy of its movement echoes the vitality of the portraits in the Transparent and Hibba series. In this way the ribbon paintings and their title serve as a metaphor for the relational character of the figurative work throughout the exhibition. In the journey from clichéd images to intimate renderings of friends, Adolfsen uncovers the colorful psychical, emotional, and empathic bonds that tie the artist to his subjects and, in turn, the viewer to the artwork.

Born in 1964, self-taught Danish painter Per Adolfsen has shown his work in New York, Germany, Hong Kong, and Denmark. His exhibitions include several gallery and museum exhibitions, including at the Frederikshavn Kunstmuseum- og Exlibrissamling and at the Kastrupgaardsamlingen. The Ribbons That Tie Us is Adolfsen’s second solo exhibition at 532 Gallery.

Celebrating its 10th year, 532 Gallery’s  objective is to present fresh, vibrant works that capture the aesthetic dynamics of 21st century. The gallery represents a group of international artists who are producing significant works of lasting value that explore, engage and resonate with contemporary visual culture.

Ten Years After

In celebration of our tenth year in Chelsea, we are pleased to present Ten Years After, an exhibition of works by artists we’ve been privileged to work with over the last decade. The show’s participants include artists from the United States, Europe and Cuba; the selection of works on display showcases the gallery’s commitment to exhibiting striking and thought-provoking works that embody a wide range of styles, techniques, and artistic visions.

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