On The Edge Of The Wilds

 

On the Edge of the Wilds

Amy Wilson, Electric Coffin, Elio Rodriguez, Lennart Rieder

July 2 – August 1, 2019

 

Chelsea, New York: On the Edge of the Wilds, a new exhibition of works at 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel, features five artists who each make use of a distinct set of materials, methods, and artistic concerns to create works that reflect a sense of ambivalence about modern culture and our relation to nature at a time when both are in a precarious state of flux.

 

Seattle-based collaborative duo Electric Coffin (artists Duffy de Armas and Stefan Hofmann) have fabricated four works that look something like gigantic stickers peeled from the deck of a gargantuan hipster’s skateboard. 

 

Amy Wilson presents four new knit and crochet pieces that reference traditional women’s crafts, political manifestos, and the general doom, gloom, and uncertainty of 2019. 

 

In a set of four recent oil paintings that include the aptly-titled Jungle and three floral still lifes embedded within undulating, wavelike backgrounds, German artist Lennart Rieder seems to point toward the profound gulf between humanity and the natural matrix from which we once emerged. 

 

Cuban artist Elio Rodríguez returns to Jaeckel Gallery with a selection of his wall-mounted monochromatic soft sculptures. 

 

Full Press Release (link)

 

For further information, please contact 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel by phone at 1.917.701.3338, or by e-mail at info@532gallery.com

Categories: Exhibitions Past

Lien Truong: In The Shadow of a Vessel

 

Lien Truong

In the Shadow of a Vessel

June 6 – July 2, 2019

 

Chelsea, New York: 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel presents In the Shadow of a Vessel, an exhibition of paintings by Lien Truong, opening June 6th. This is Truong’s first solo exhibition with the gallery.

Lien Truong’s recent paintings layer different times. Situated between the past and the future, they represent significant events in American history, pointing to an ambiguous present that conflates defiance with prejudice and moral risk. Alluding to America’s legacy of perpetual war, Truong melds a soft, painterly palette with references to symbols that overflow with historical meaning.

Part of Truong’s technique involves reference to historic Asian silk painting. Patterns of cloth seem to absorb the lineage of violence in the collective American psyche. In a work like “A Delicate History between the Harpy and an Angel” (2019) fabrics are set vertically, and between them cartoon nooses have been interposed. These modernized cartoon nooses emotively comment on the silk prepared and painted by the artist, in cropped, dark, figurative narrations. In “The Neurosis of Blood and Stone” (2019) strips of fabric seem to burst from the belly of a severed horse—a beast of burden too often used in wars. In both paintings, the physicality of the body becomes a ghost-like abstraction.

Vessels, like any other object that contains space within itself, can be broken; they can spill over. In the Shadow of a Vessel refers to, on the one hand, objects, figures, and persons ravaged by war and other affronts to personal autonomy. On the other hand, the paintings themselves are vessels, setting in relief historical indignities suffered by individuals at the hands of the state. In this latter sense, the paintings ensheath specific histories along with a retroactive desire for justice. The vessels on view give rhythm and shape to people and places whose histories have been all but erased.

Read Full Press Release (link)

Categories: Exhibitions Past

Diana Copperwhite: The Clock Struck Between Time

 

Diana Copperwhite

The Clock Struck Between Time

April 30 – June 1, 2019.

 

Chelsea, New York: 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel is very honored to present Diana Copperwhite’s, The Clock Struck between Time, from April 30 to June 1, 2019. The opening reception is on Tuesday, April 30 from 6pm to 8pm, with the artist in attendance. 

Copperwhite, who is based in Dublin, in these new paintings expands upon her concerns of figuration, abstraction, and representation with references both to time as it is observed and counted and to the temporality of music and memory. Her arresting critical approach to abstraction by way of a “computer-inflected visuality,” as suggested by Stephen Maine in his Hyperallergic 2017 review, suggests reality is a pliant screen and evokes the instability of images and the fragility of memories as metaphors for the precariousness of our present realities.

 

Full Press Release (link)

The Brooklyn Rail – The Clock Struck Between Time (article link)

Artist’s Page (link)

Sky Kim: Each One All

 

 

Sky Kim

Each One All

February 28 – April 6, 2019.

 

In her first solo show at Thomas Jaeckel Gallery, Korean artist Sky Kim presents an exhibition of intricate and powerful watercolors that stunningly push the medium far beyond its traditionally assumed visual and conceptual limitations. Imbued with a sense of calm but profound mystery, the paintings in Each One All evoke the gentle presence of a flower in bloom, or the quiet self-assertion of a breathtaking array of stars in a clear desert sky. Kim’s mesmerizing masses of undulating interlaced strands and radial vortexes evoke the endless beauties of nature while retaining an eerie alienness that vests them with a vaguely otherworldly aura.

Kim’s paintings have a systematic and coherent internal logic that mimics the complex interplay of order and dissolution found at every level of the cosmos. Each image hints at as-yet-undiscovered natural forms lurking just beyond our perceptual horizons. The untitled pieces in her Multiverse series have the feeling of fantastical galaxies congealed from thousands of tiny, shiny spheres that resemble pearls, glass beads, or steel bearings (in once piece, these forms are juxtaposed against actual Swarovski crystals, creating a fascinating contrast between her illusionistic rendering and their literal presence). In a piece from the Wavelength series, thousands of painstakingly rendered strands are woven into a hairlike mass that floats in an indeterminate gray space; the resulting form is both an integral entity and a dismembered clump at once. The Vortex and Portal series hint at fragile aquatic forms including brittle sea urchin shells, delicate clusters of octopus eggs, and soft globular colonies of our most ancient unicellular ancestors in the primordial seas. Kim’s bridging of scales from the cosmic to the microscopic and her spanning of the gulf between the organic and inorganic brings to mind Arthur Koestler’s idea of holons, structures found throughout the universe that are both wholes made up of smaller parts and parts of larger structures. Each of Kim’s paintings is both a self-contained microcosm—a universe in miniature—and a fanciful yet believable snapshot of the innumerable processes and interactions through which the cosmos unfolds, and by which it persists and thrives.

Both formally and conceptually, these watercolors are a fascinating study in the natural emergence of tremendous complexity from the most rudimentary elements. Given the minimal nature of the basic forms at play in these works—the sphere, the circle, the smooth linear strand—it’s astonishing to see the variety of moods and effects that emanate from them. Hundreds of undulating strands made of small, shiny spheres intertwine into a mass much like a cloud, a deep-space nebula, or an tangle of kelp bobbing on the surface of a tide pool. Petal-like blue teardrops cluster around a dark circular void; each seems to push slightly in a distinct direction within the system’s vaguely concentric overall flow, creating a subtle tension that suggests a delicate balance between corporate harmony and individual struggle. Other circular or ovoid constructions split and double via mitosis; extend pseudopod-like protrusions; or cling to one another with delicate arrays of beaded tendrils in a delicate dance that subtly echoes the give-and-take rhythms of life. Kim’s use of color often reinforces these associations in subtle ways. Most of the paintings are dominated by somber shades of black and gray, but set against them are also soft watery blues, deep violets and lustrous shades of dark turquoise that suggest bioluminescence, and the intense red of both blood and nature’s exuberant palette.

The show’s centerpiece is a 30-foot-long scroll running down the gallery wall and out into the exhibition space. At the top looms a circular, mouthlike vortex comprised of soft teardrop shapes; down from this extends a thick, undulating appendage that meanders and loops along the paper’s length with the seeming abandon of spores carried by a playful, untamable breeze. The tentacular form disappears into the rolled-up end of the scroll, allowing us to imagine its journey continuing on forever, like that of life and the cosmos itself.

Categories: Exhibitions Past

Jose Vincench : The Burden of Words

 

 

Jose Angel Vincench

The Burden Of Words

January 24 – February 23, 2019.

 

Chelsea, New York: In The Burden Of Words, Thomas Jaeckel Gallery showcases recent works by Cuban artist Jose Angel Vincench. This is the artist’s second solo show with the gallery.

 

Looking at Jose Angel Vincench’s geometric abstractions, one can’t help being stunned by all their luminosity — the light inherent in their gold, the most precious metal of all minerals, all the more so because of its symbolic import – and their innovative, idiosyncratic geometry. Gold is universally regarded as a sacred material, a symbol of transcendence, like the sun that rises above the earth it shines on. We cannot live without its miraculous light, and we value gold because it is imbued with light. It is a peculiarly abstract material, a sort of immaterial material like light. Gold is the most malleable of metals; working with gold leaf, as Vincench does, is to bend light to one’s aesthetic and expressive purpose.

 

Vincench rises to the sun, as Icarus did, but unlike Icarus he does not fall, nor burn himself as he touches the light. (Donald Kuspit, “Ironical Gold: Jose Angel Vincench’s Conceptual Abstraction”)

 

We are pleased to represent Jose Angel Vincench. Vincench (born 1973, Holguin, Cuba) is a Cuban artist, living and working in Havana. He completed his art studies in Havana’s Instituto Superior de Arte (ISA). His works have been exhibited in New York, Zurich, Havana, and are in the collection of UBS Art Collection, New York, and Chris vin Christierson Collection, London, as well as many private collections.

 

Categories: Exhibitions Past

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John Parks: “Putti”

John Alexander Parks 
Putti
November 15 – December 22, 2018.

 

                                                                                                                                               

Indefatigable New York/British painter John A. Parks, takes on the subject of putti, those mysteriously animated infants who show up in so many classical paintings. Aping and often exaggerating adult behavior, they reflect the complexities of human interaction in ways that can be both charming and frightening.  Parks paints them fighting, whispering, frolicking, dancing and flying as he explores and exploits their curious existence.  Part artistic convention  and part real children, his putti offer a tool for the painter’s imagination, a vehicle with which he can make explicit the powerful forces of attraction, deceit and violence while presenting them in a form that is often beguilingly playful. Parks has also used putti to substitute for the traditional classical figures of the constellations, filling the night sky with combinations of putti interacting in all manner of improbable ways. While many of his paintings are executed in a straightforward oil technique he has also explored heavier surfaces in some of them, creating powerful sgraffito drawing scored through layers of thick acrylic paste, and then building paintings richly soaked in color on this heavily textured surface. These works take on some of the authority and curiosity of ancient mural cycles, brought up to date with an edgy touch, fine drawing and a sparkling imagination. 

John A. Parks (1952 ) was born and educated in England earning a masters degree in painting from the Royal College of Art, London.  He has lived in New York since the late seventies and exhibited his work for many years with the Allan Stone Gallery. While his early work was realist in nature his later work has explored a variety of avenues in representational painting.  He is a member of the faculty of the School of Visual Arts, New York.

Categories: Exhibitions Past

Lifeline as Medium: Recent Works by Arghavan Khosravi and Cecilia Charlton

 
Lifeline as Medium: Recent Works by Arghavan Khosravi and Cecilia Charlton 

October 18 – November 13, 2018

 
In Lifeline as Medium, Thomas Jaeckel Gallery showcases two bodies of recent work from Iranian-born painter Arghavan Khosravi and American artist Cecilia Charlton. Both artists’ creations convey a strong sense of the ancient in dialogue with the contemporary; each uses an inventive combination of diverse mediums, both traditional and modern; and both work with compelling imagery that demands the viewer’s participation to reveal hidden meanings and elusive narratives that are only hinted at by surface appearances. The works on display are the product of two lives lived under the influence of a vast and varied range of past experiences, as well as a strong commitment to discovering a new life for traditional art and craft processes within the realm of contemporary art. A dual portrait emerges of two artists striving — each in her own unique way — to make us question where we’ve been and where we’re going.

Categories: Exhibitions Past

Carlos Rodriguez Cardenas: Geographical Mind in the Architecture of Landscape

                                                                                                                                                   
Carlos Rodríguez Cárdenas

Geographical Mind in the Architecture of Landscape 

September 13 – October 13, 2018

Jaeckel Gallery is pleased to present Geographical Mind in the Architecture of Landscape, an exhibition of recent works by Carlos Rodríguez Cárdenas. In his native Cuba during the 1980s, Carlos Rodríguez Cárdenas developed an influential style of painting that deployed irony, sly humor, and a shrewd parody of High-Modernist sophistication to mock the conceits of official state-sponsored imagery and utopian sloganeering. In Geographical Mind in the Architecture of Landscape Cárdenas turns a discerning eye toward the United States, delivering a body of work that seems at first glance like a love letter to the American landscape and to the modern city—New York being his adopted home of many years now—yet gradually reveals an undercurrent of wariness and disquiet about our national myths and pretensions. Alongside this is an extended meditation on his own migrations, and on the endless tension between the fundamental human desire for stability and the inevitability of flux in our lives.

References to monumental constructions, modern technology, and utopian aspirations have always been a cornerstone of Cárdenas’s visual language. In these works, he uses such imagery to powerful effect, juxtaposing bold, semi-abstracted renditions of cityscapes and sea vessels with picturesque antique views of landmark buildings and collaged insets from maps of the U.S. and other countries; the combination evokes the grand narratives of progress and power that have always informed this country’s collective self-image, yet also makes these stories seem quaint, or even wistfully naive. The centerpiece of the show (The Journey, 2007-2018) is a frieze-like row of paintings with a squarely frontal view of tiny stylized skyscrapers and ships perched atop a massive wall of gargantuan bricks and gloomily featureless towers. The effect is something like the monotonous terrain of an old-school side-scrolling video game, suggesting perpetual travel with neither rest nor peace. Yet the varied light-blue shades of the bricks suggest expanses of open sky and sea, hinting at the possibility of freedom and escape from the strictures of law and dogma. The Bunker (2015) hints at similar notions via a pentaptych depicting a gargantuan seaborne ark/metropolis, while Geographical Mind  (2018) combines a clock face, compass points, and small circular insets from road maps of the U.S., Cuba, and Mexico, referencing the age-old human drive to dominate nature’s unruliness (and our own) with artificially imposed systems and structures.

Cárdenas understands classic visual metaphors for our cities and landscapes well, and he quotes them to great effect. His minimal, stylized buildings are strongly reminiscent of works by other artists we associate with New York in its modernist heyday, ranging from the Precisionist Charles Sheeler and Charles Demuth to Georgia O’Keefe and even Joseph Cornell. Small rectangular patches in the diptych American Landscape (2015) recall the vast, clear skies in Ed Ruscha’s Hollywood and Standard Station paintings and the grand-scale mythologizing of the American landscape of the Hudson River School painters. The evocation of these great Modernist chroniclers of the American myth adds a poignant twinge to Cárdenas’s status as the perpetual outsider looking in.

His works are included in such major collections as the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York; the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston; the Museum of Art in Fort Lauderdale, Florida; the Museum Ludwig in Cologne, Germany; and Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de La Habana in Havana.

For further information, please contact Jaeckel Gallery by phone at 1.917.701.3338, or by e-mail at info@532gallery.com

Categories: Past

DANNY ROLPH: “WCW”

Danny Rolph

WCW

May 10 – June 21, 2018

 

PRESS RELEASE

532 Gallery is pleased to announce WCW, an exhibition of new paintings by London-based artist Danny Rolph.  This is the artist’s second solo show with the gallery.

 

Rolph’s exhibition of a new body of work made over the last year showcases the artist’s signature Triplewall paintings.  A continuation of his visually impactful paintings, these new works reflect his evolving exploration of high velocity color and layered narratives.  The compositional potential of his painting strategies on Triplewall plastic allow the viewer’s senses to be fully engaged. The paintings are layered and emotive, combining paint, drawings and collage with art historical and Pop Art references.

 

In the “WCW” painting, there are heraldic motifs and the drawing of a cowboy hat near the top.  Two large floaty irregular cylindrical “shapes”, one outlined and one purple and white, billow across the surface like curtains.  Across the bottom there is a design-like twisted shape in the middle in purple/gray.  Along the bottom two larger areas of yellow bracket a pink rectangle that hangs on bronze strings like a banner without a name.  The composition regains a sort of architectural order with turquoise and pink lines near the center of the painting.  There are many fragments of colors and lens like shapes throughout the painting. 

 

The exhibition’s title WCW is in homage to the American Modernist poet William Carlos Williams whose work the artist has long admired and is evident in the titles chosen such as “red wheelbarrow”.  The poet’s friend, Kenneth Burke, said that poetry is “equipment for living, a necessary guide amid the bewilderments of life”.  Rolph’s new paintings are built around and above model airplane instructions that work as a backdrop for his sharp, delicate, painterly and emotive compositions.  The idea of creating and exploration is thus embedded in the background, and serves as a metaphor for the artist’s studio. 

 

Looping painted lines of color, purple, teal and blue among them, float above as navigational devices.  Prints, watercolors and drawings jostle for attention around all of Rolph’s compositions.  The work throughout the exhibition is a visual equivalent of a poem.

 

Rolph has an MA in painting from the Royal College of Art, London and was the Rome Scholarship at the British School at Rome. His recent solo exhibitions include ‘Painted on the sky’, Barbara Davis Gallery, Houston; ‘Recollection’, 532 Gallery; ‘Atelier’, E.S.A.D. Valence, France; ‘kissing balloons in the jungle’, Poppy Sebire gallery, London; ‘ten minutes from now’, Eden Rock Gallery, St.Barths.  His work is represented in many international collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and the Tate Gallery, London.

 

For more information, please contact the gallery at info@532gallery.com

 

                                       

Categories: Exhibitions Past

Per Adolfsen: The Ribbons That Tie Us

 

Per Adolfsen
The Ribbons That Tie Us
March 1 – 31, 2018

532 Gallery is pleased to present our second solo exhibition with Danish painter Per Adolfsen. An exhibition of figurative works and portraiture from 2014 to the present The Ribbons That Tie Us showcases the artist’s sensitive rendering of his subjects’ inner lives. A marked break with his previous emotionally charged acrylic paintings that merged representation, abstraction, and text (exhibited at 532 Gallery Jaeckel in 2010), the contemplative oil paintings in The Ribbons That Tie Us demonstrate the artist’s evolving and deepening commitment to breaking past stereotype and false exteriors in order to truly know other people. The neutral palette and minimal backgrounds in many of his paintings allow the viewer to be fully present with the people foregrounded in them who are punctuated by moments of brilliant color—a lavender head scarf, crystalline blue eyes.

Transparent (2017)

In his Transparent series, Adolfsen abandons the superficial cliché as a starting point and instead looks deeply to reveal the multifaceted psyche of his sitter, a fellow artist friend. Transparent II is bathed in an invigorating pale blue haze that permeates the woman’s skin and clothing. The border between her body and the background blurs at times. Is she in a state of dissipation or becoming? Regardless, she stands unperturbed: shoulders square with the viewer, lips cocked in a confident smirk. Not the mere object of a consuming gaze, the woman in Transparent II asserts her own agency by looking back at the viewer. Transparent III shows the same woman slightly larger than life. Once again meeting the viewer’s gaze with blue-green eyes—whose lids are described in sharp orange lines with the geometric structure of Cézanne’s graphite portraits—she appears relaxed, yet strong.

Transparent I reveals a different facet of Adolfsen’s artist friend, and by doing so gives the viewer a fuller picture of her. A powerful warm light threatens to overwhelm the figure—her skin and yellow camisole almost lost in the blinding glow of the background—yet her eyes securely anchor her in space and bind her to the viewer even while a series of quick, repetitive diagonal strokes describing her hair bely an inner anxiety.

Hibba (2016)

Adolfsen’s series of portraits of his Danish-Muslim friend Hibba are the apogee of his journey into empathic, deep looking. In Hibba I we see the bold contour of Hibba’s dignified profile against a background of alabastrine white whose light infuses the composition with warm energy. Brushmarks delicately sitting on the surface of the canvas attentively describe Hibba’s eyes, eyebrows, lips; her self-assured expression and her gaze are simultaneously introspective and assertive. As in all four portraits of Hibba, cascading lines follow the folds of her lavender hijab, which Adolfsen renders beautiful without exoticizing.

In the Hibba series, as in the Transparent series, Adolfsen’s multiple portraits work in concert to reveal a fully dimensional personality. In Hibba II and Hibba III, Hibba looks out at the viewer with disarming humor. She seems to say, “I caught you looking at me. Well, I can look back at you, too!” In Hibba IV she retracts her gaze, and playfully rolls her eyes. Rather than rendering her the passive object of the artist’s gaze, Adolfsen has opened a space where Hibba asserts her own agency.

In contemporary North America and Europe countless phobic and stereotypical images portray Muslim women as either cold and threatening or as helpless and oppressed. (In canonical Western painting Muslim women have been largely invisible, save for their exoticization in nineteenth-century “Orientalist” works.) At other times today, the Muslim woman becomes a political icon, as in Shepard Fairey’s We the People posters (2017), one of which features Queens resident Munira Ahmed wearing a United States flag as hijab. Adolfsen’s Hibba overcomes both extremes: stereotype and icon. By looking and looking again, he is able to truly see Hibba and know who she is outside of any political rhetoric, which in the present climate is paradoxically an implicit political act.

Clichés (2014)

In 2014 Adolfsen painted a series exploring clichéd images of femininity. The most sophisticated works in this series occupy an ambivalent territory: on the one hand they investigate the flattening effects of stereotypes, which he imports from both the weighty tradition of Western figurative painting and contemporary advertising; but on the other hand, they begin to dismantle stereotypical roles and gazes by revealing an emerging agency in their female subjects.

In a pose that could have been appropriated from a cosmetics or facial cleanser advertisement, the poised figure in profile in Spanish Woman looms monumental. The side of her face, cast in cool maroon shadow, deflects the viewer’s gaze forcing it to ricochet among the patterns of painted parallel streaks composing her face and the background. Lubricious painterly lines fluidly slide along the figure in Berlin Woman who stares at the viewer with an intensity that recalls the paintings of Die Brücke. Her nakedness and closed body language suggest vulnerability and guardedness; her clenched fist indicates a latent ferocity. The pose is one that could have been taken from any number of titillating, sexy advertisements, but the figure’s psychological intensity—reinforced by the fiery orange shadows around the eyes—and the androgynous queering of gender defy prepackaged commercial messaging.

The Ribbons That Tie Us (2016)

The exhibition’s title The Ribbons That Tie Us refers to a homonymous series of still lifes included in the show, in which painted bands of ribbon glide back and forth across the surface of the canvas like dancers entering and exiting a stage. In one, orange ribbons occasionally twist and turn abruptly, like leaps and pauses in the choreography. The warmth of this painting’s color and the energy of its movement echoes the vitality of the portraits in the Transparent and Hibba series. In this way the ribbon paintings and their title serve as a metaphor for the relational character of the figurative work throughout the exhibition. In the journey from clichéd images to intimate renderings of friends, Adolfsen uncovers the colorful psychical, emotional, and empathic bonds that tie the artist to his subjects and, in turn, the viewer to the artwork.

Born in 1964, self-taught Danish painter Per Adolfsen has shown his work in New York, Germany, Hong Kong, and Denmark. His exhibitions include several gallery and museum exhibitions, including at the Frederikshavn Kunstmuseum- og Exlibrissamling and at the Kastrupgaardsamlingen. The Ribbons That Tie Us is Adolfsen’s second solo exhibition at 532 Gallery.

Celebrating its 10th year, 532 Gallery’s  objective is to present fresh, vibrant works that capture the aesthetic dynamics of 21st century. The gallery represents a group of international artists who are producing significant works of lasting value that explore, engage and resonate with contemporary visual culture.

Categories: Exhibitions Past