Archive for the ‘Past Shows’ Category

Winter Salon

 

February 4 – March 4, 2017

Reception: Saturday, February 4,  4-6pm

It’s that time of the year for the gallery’s annual Winter Salon.  This show features new works by Gustavo Acosta, Bernard Ammerer, Bergman & White, Marcy Brafman, Kathy Bruce, Marie Dolma Chophel, Jallim Eudovic, Reynier Ferrer, John A. Parks, Ian Hughes, Ilyan Ivanov, Julie Langsam, Nadja Marcin, Darrell Nettles, Alastair Noble, Eva O’Leary, Tanja Selzer.

Working across diverse media, including painting, photographs, mixed media, video, these artists pursue the addiction of art from varying and unique points of view. Brought together, their vibrant works create a space for seductive engagement and thoughtful perceptions.

 

 

 

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Depend on the Morning Sun

 

Diana Copperwhite
Through January 28, 2017
Depend on the Morning Sun

The exhibition effectively extends the continuum of abstractions in color that have engaged the artist in recent years.  Fusing schematic shapes and fragments, her apparent abstractions recall a flash of connections through time, or maybe a glimpse of switching of identities, or the way an interior, or an external, space may be seen via moving digitized images.  We are drawn by the vivid light and color of her paintings and are left with a test in our bringing an identification of her imagery.

The exhibition is accompanied by new monograph ‘Fake New World’ with an essay by Gail Levin.
Diana Copperwhite makes big bold oil paintings that excite and stir our twenty-first-century perceptions.  Her compelling images are both complex and energetic.  She is never at a loss for the impulse to paint, though she is coy about revealing her concerns, often throwing the viewer just a few clues and leaving a lot of room for the imagination.  She creates an exquisite tension between abstraction and figuration or representation of any kind.  She appears to tease out this tension to hold our interest, as we both take in the visual splendor of her paintings and try to fathom what they are about.” (Excerpts from Essay)

Gail Levin PhD, Professor of Art History, American Studies, and Women Studies at Baruch College and the Graduate Center of CUNY.

Hyperallergic.com Review by Stephen Maine “Signal to Noise” January 7, 2017

Diana Copperwhite, born 1969, lives and works in Dublin.  Copperwhite has exhibited widely in Ireland and other countries in Europe.  Recent solo exhibitions include Driven by Distraction, Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin, 2016, A Million and One Things Under the Sun, Kevin Kavanagh, Dublin, 2015, Shadowland, Thomas Jaeckel, New York, 2014, solo presentations at PULSE NY, 2015 where she was nominated for the PULSE prize and at Volta NY, 2013.  Copperwhite was awarded the AIB Art Prize in 2007 and her work is held in many important public collections, including the Office of Public Works, the Irish Museum of Modern Art, the Arts Council of Ireland, Limerick City Gallery of Art, Dublin Institute of Technology as well as private collections in Ireland, across Europe and in the United States.

 

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Susana Guerrero: Anatomy of a Myth

 


 

Susana Guerrero: Anatomy of a Myth
September 15 – October 22, 2016

 

We are pleased to present Susana Guerrero’s first US solo exhibition, Anatomy of a Myth in New York.

Through her inventions, Susana Guerrero is set upon taking up themes of mythology and utopia (mythopia), bringing together a genealogy of the materials, an anthropology of human experience, guided by the murmur of a dream.  She allows a perceptual interpretation of a different kind.

Many of Guerrero’s artworks evoke a contemporary mythology that puts on the same plane the visible physical reality, the substance of dreams and the subconscious, the hidden reality.

There’s a kind of reformulation of ancient mythologies, constituting personal thoughts of the sacred through mythical stories, traditions and legends, superstitions and intuitive revelations.

In the process of making the artwork, Guerrero reveals a binding ritual.  The choice of every material, the configuration of every shape, of every element, brings a poetic meaning and symbolism to her artwork.

Indications of imaginary blood and path through veins and arteries, active heart, organs out of place yet connected to a life system.  Guerrero may posit a relatively fractured or whole woman, or a person in different bodily states.  As she makes the crisply graphic work, more figurative forms are mixed with unspecifiable shapes or abstracted forms in parts of her composition.

Her most vivid construction would be derived from a varying “mythopia”.  The result is formed with features that may be confrontational or bacchanal.  Parts of it may be supposed to urge identification or resist it.  In this case, the filling of the space often places a situation akin to a breaking out, a way of purifying the spirit and getting to new ideas.

Susana Guerrero is a Fine Arts PHD, Miguel Hernandez University, Elche, Spain (2012).  She received an Advanced Studies Award (D.E.A.), Miguel Hernandez University, Elche (2007), and graduated Sculpture and Print, Polytechnic University in Valencia, Spain (1996-1997).  She was granted Fellowships from: Project LLP-Erasmus, Academia Belle Arti di Macerata, Italia (2004); Artist Residency in Lithography at Münchner Kunstlerhaus, Munich, Germany (2004); Ceramic Fellowship LABORATORIO DE FORMA, Empresa Grupo Sargadelos, Cervo, Lugo (2003); Program of Artistic Residency from Mexican Government thru Mexican Institute of International Cooperation from Foreign Affairs of Mexico, run by Gilberto Aceves Navarro (2002); Program of Artistic Residency from Mexican Government thru Mexican Institute of International Cooperation from Foreign Affairs of Mexico, National School of  Fine Arts, México (2000); PROMOE, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Extension Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico (1997); ERASMUS Anotati Scholi Kalin Tehnon, Athens, Greece (1995).

She is a professor at Miguel Hernandez University, Fine Arts Campus, Altea, Spain, since 2003.  Guerrero’s work is in several institutional collections, including: Kunstlerhaus, Munich, Germany; Instituto Mexicano de Cooperacion Internacional, Mexico; Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico; City Hall of Alicante; City Hall of Leganes, Madrid; City Hall of Elche; Alicante Instituto de Cultura Juan Gil Albert; Universidad de Cantabria; Foundation Spanish Contemporary Print Museum of Marbella; Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Elche; Palau de la Musica, Valencia.

 

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Bernard Ammerer “Interface”


Bernard Ammerer

Interface
May 19 – June 30, 2016

A woman races from nowhere to nowhere through an indistinctly rendered forest. A loose scattering of young men hovers in a strange white space, suspended in time. Solitary wanderers traverse barren plains toward destinations that loom invitingly in the distance, yet fade into disheartening insubstantiality upon arrival. At every turn, there is the sense of something forever sought but never seized.

In his first solo show in the United States at 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel, Bernard Ammerer depicts a private domain of desolate landscapes and vaguely restless figures that would border on the surreal if it didn’t feel so eerily familiar. Across the exhibition’s dozen canvases—all from this year and last—we see small cliques of physically and psychologically isolated people at uneasy rest or in frantic motion; cloud-filled skies looming serenely over flat, featureless, stark-white plains; and lone travelers in obscure territories that are shrouded in fog, reduced to cartoonish black silhouettes, or completely replaced with generic words—Wood, Field—that diminish nature to a worthless and empty abstraction.

Ammerer’s pointed and ironic titles often hint at the somber thread of disaffection that ties these works together. Interface—a six-foot-square canvas depicting a constellation of nondescript young men in jeans and t-shirts frozen mid-leap in a white void—is most notable for the palpable lack of physical and psychological interaction among its inhabitants. Fulfillment Problem—that bland euphemism from the realm of online commerce that so often signifies corporate ineptitude and consumer frustration—is paired with the image of a cloudy yellowish sky overrun with a chaotic, maze-like swarm of identical running figures lifted from a Children At Play traffic safety sign. The infantile and perpetually unsatisfying urge toward instant gratification that’s satirized here is subtly underscored by Boyhood, which presents the sad and wistful disembodied head of a child floating alone in a dark, nebulous space. It’s the only place in these works where an actual face can be seen, and its stark difference from the other canvasses hints at an irrevocable loss of naive serenity that no hoard of shiny toys, transient pleasures, or wanderlust can amend. The moral—for Ammerer’s oblivious protagonists as well as us—is perhaps best embodied in Home, with its ghostly white house at the end of a blank path in a barren field: far too often, our ill-considered quests away from ourselves in pursuit of the Next Perfect Thing leave us alone and exhausted before a hollow apparition.

Bernard Ammerer (1978) lives and works in Vienna. He graduated University für angewandte Kunst, Wien in 2010 and is the recipient of the Strabag Art Award.
Recent exhibitions include “Vorher Nachher” Galerie Frey Wien (solo), Dagong Art Museum, Qingdao (group), ”Subjects” Galerie Drees, Hannover, (group) “A Better Place” Galerie Frey, Salzburg,(solo) “You Choose” Berlin Art Projects, Berlin(group)

For further information, please contact 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel by phone at 1.917.701.3338, or by e-mail at info@532gallery.com

Preview works here

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Puzzled

Elio Rodriguez

April 1 – May 14, 2016

Elio Rodriguez’ first solo exhibition in New York City is comprised of large scale soft sculptures and will be on view at 532 West 25th Street until May 9, 2016. Coinciding with his exhibition On Guard, at Harvard University’s Hutchins Center for Afro-Latin Studies and Context Art New York, Pier 94, May 4-8, 2016.
An opening reception for the artist will be held Thursday, March 31 from 6 to 8 p.m

Elio experiments with the construction of the intimacy of interior and exterior spaces, all things carnal and decorative, functional and artistic, manufactured and native.  His soft sculptures reimagine familiar forms using, in abundant measure, plant and carnal shapes, juxtaposed against sundry objects, metal screws, lace corsets, chains, belts, wire, filament, pins — with results that are pictorial equivalents of familiar concepts and concerns.

In his stuffed, massive soft sculptures, loaded messages about stereotypes, sexual or racial or otherwise, are hidden within exaggerated, provocative rendering of the mysteries of organic, invasive fauna, entangled in space by which a far-out untamed nature is introduced.  Lush, ritualistic, magical, multiple perspectives serve as metaphors for the state of his own Afro-Cuban-ism coalesced with the state of the female, as might be interpreted through the popular discourse in our modern times.

Elio’s work may veer into a kind of kitsch, but he does so magnificently in the most unlikely, playful, witty, voluptuous, sensory, sensual ways.

Elio Rodríguez (Havana, 1966) graduated from Havana’s Higher Institute of Art (ISA) in 1989 and quickly became one of the leading figures in the new Afro-Cuban cultural movement that emerged in Cuba during the 1990s. He has had solo and group shows in Latin America, Europe and the US. In 2015, Elio was the Cohen Fellow at the Du Bois Research Institute and the Afro-Latin American Research Institute, Hutchins Center for African & African American Research. His artworks are part of important public and private collections, including National Arts Museum of Cuba;  Von Christierson Collection, London;  Shelley & Donald Rubin Collection, New York; Peggy Cooper Crafritz Collection, Washington DC;  W.E.B. Du Bois Institute, Harvard University.

 

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The Weight of Words

THE WEIGHT OF WORDS

José Angel Vincench

February 26 – March 26, 2016

Thomas Jaeckel and Rachel Weingeist are pleased to announce recent works by Cuban artist, Jose Vincench in The Weight of Words, an exhibition of painting and sculpture.  Works by the artist will be exhibited concurrently in Jaeckel Gallery and at the Pulse New York art fair (Booth A209, March 3-6) and the University of Tampa’s Scarfone Hartley Gallery, FL (March 4-18).

A key figure in Cuban contemporary art, Vincench is identified in his latest works with visually aseptic, abstract imagery that is largely heir to the legacies of concrete abstraction, conceptualism, and language-based art.  His work often reflects an underlying process of deconstruction meant to express his experience within the social-political actuality of Cuba today, especially the use of rhetoric as a means of symbolic domination and referencing the sometimes tragic aftermath of resistance  and dissent. Thus Vincench positions himself within a still central dichotomy of art-making in post-revolutionary Cuba: between the inner search for beauty, self-awareness, and art for art’s sake, and the more outward-facing urge to reflect on, criticize, or attempt to transform social reality by activism. (David Horta)

 In works on canvas from his ongoing series, Vincench uses the geometry of highly charged Spanish-English cognates, such as Autonomia (Autonomy), Gusano (Worm aka Traitor), Exilo (Exile).  Stacking the letters on top of each other using a personalized iconic geometry, Vincench builds his own vocabulary and meaning.  Today it is the Gusanos (Traitors) who are able to provide capital to reinvest in their motherland, ironically.

Gold leaf works on canvas and Action Paintings (Pintura de action), splattered gold illuminations depict rarely documented and often not reported incidents of paint thrown at the houses of Cuban dissidents.  An appropriation of these little known, low resolution Cuban image files, pixelated and distorted, are sweetened by the artist’s decorative gold interpretations.

Vincench: “Gold leaf provides me a seductive, poetic and lyrical old world craft material. I am intentionally creating a decorative product, ironic historical reality of yesterday and today, where we can forgive and reconcile.  My abstraction starts with photos, testimony of the violence of the government on the dissidents, but more than a political statement I prefer to talk about the silence in the civil society and art.  The artworks absorb the cynicism of this society, they are ironically based on the human drama found in images and words.”

Vincench’s paintings and sculptures are simultaneously intellectually challenging and conceptual works with resplendent minimal appeal.

A respected Professor at the infamous graduate program of the Instituto Superior de Arte in Havana, Cuba, Vincench’s work is a part of numerous private and public international collections including: Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, La Havana, Cuba; Pizzuti Collection; CIFO Collection, Miami, FL; Frost Museum, Florida International University, Miami; Perez Collection, Miami;  Shelley and Donald Rubin, New York, NY; Chris von Christierson, London, UK; Estrella Brodsky, New York, NY.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Winter Salon

   through feb 22
   

Jaeckel Gallery is pleased to present a winter group show.  This show features many returning artists to our gallery, as well as a few artists showing with us for the first time.  The works on view include smaller scale works in a variety of mediums.

To highlight just a few.  Text-based “Witt” drawings by Alastair Noble, a meditation on Wittgenstein’s “Remarks on Colour”, communicate the colors mentioned and the content in Wittgenstein’s text about the ambiguities of light and color. John Parks’s delicately painted “Garden with Soldier” presents a wistful and very gently ironic vision of his English heritage. Holger Keifel’s photograph of Louise Bourgeois ‘Hand with Clay’ exists in a hidden message or puzzle. Kathy Bruce’s eclectic signature mix of collage and drawing takes a more classical turn in her “Adaptive Behavior” series. Abstract paintings by Jac Lahav evoke the philosopher’s stone, magical talismans, his youth by the Mediterranean. Ilyan Ivanov’s “Self Portrait” paintings explore the ambivalence between geometric structure and free brush strokes, reflecting one’s own personal conflicts between convention and spontaneity.  In Kylie Heidenheimer’s “Carnival”, she twists and wrests space via “drawn” line and intentionally placed marks. Marcy Brafman’s “Cents Rubbing Bestine” is a meditation on the magnetic field where the invisible runs the show, a place half remembered.

Each of the artists featured in the show speaks in a distinctive voice.

Featuring: Per Adolfsen, Marcy Brafman, Kathy Bruce, Diana Copperwhite, Marie-Dolma Chophel, Jeffrey Cyphers, Kylie Heidenheimer, Ian Hughes, Ilyan Ivanov, Holger Keifel, Jac Lahav, Julie Langsam, Darrell Nettles, Alastair Noble, John Parks, Danny Rolph, Elio Rodriguez, Jean Karl Petion, Piers Secunda, Tanja Selzer.

“Winter Salon” opens this Friday, 5 February and continues until 22 February, 2016.

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RECOLLECTION

DANNY ROLPH

RECOLLECTION

October 1 – November 25, 2015

For his first solo show at 532 gallery Danny Rolph presents a new body of work made over the last year. The visual impact of Rolph’s works engages the viewer’s senses in a delicious ferment. The high velocity color and fractured narratives explored in these recent paintings show an uncompromising commitment to explore the compositional potential on all the canvases and triplewall plastic that he works upon. Many references populate these new works. The influence of Pop Art as well as Vermeer’s studio narratives and Tiepolo-like skies are located in the sharp, delicate, clean, irregular and emotive compositions he employs. They are spatially indulgent and adhere to a vocabulary indebted to the power of visual discovery.

    

Rolph has an MA in painting from the Royal College of Art, London and was awarded the Rome Scholarship at the British School at Rome. He is a professor of Fine Art at Bucks New University and is a visiting lecturer at the Royal Academy Schools, London. Rolph’s recent solo exhibitions include ‘Paradiso’, Barbara Davis Gallery, Houston 2014; ‘Atelier’, E.S.A.D. Valence, France 2013; ‘kissing balloons in the jungle’, Poppy Sebire gallery, London 2012 and ‘ten minutes from now’, Eden Rock Gallery, St.Barths, Caribbean 2011. His work is represented in many international collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and the Tate Gallery, London.
  

 

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Broken Verse


Darrell Nettles

Broken Verse

June 4 – July 3, 2015

The paintings by Darrell Nettles in Broken Verse are ergodic in the deepest and most satisfying sense of the word: although they require a great deal of effort to unlock their secrets, the engagement they demand makes an encounter with them a rich and rewarding experience. Nettles’ linguistic impressionism employs the gravid ambiguity of language to reveal its deeper treasures; his visual meditations on the images and sounds of human communication owe as much to Klee and Kandinsky’s conflations of visual and musical composition as they do to the playful semantic games championed by the wordsmiths of Dada, Fluxus, and Pop.

Broken Verse is anchored by a series seven-foot-tall canvases arrayed edge to edge with dense pseudo-cryptographic patterns of thin block letters that are tightly juxtaposed and overlapped on soft-edged crossword puzzle grids. Elements have been added, effaced, and replaced into dense palimpsests; words emerge and sounds arise as the eye follows its own course. An underlying architectonic uniformity hints at a clandestine dialogue between the canvases. They speak from their own side with the compelling but exasperating self-assertion found in ancient cyphers and obscure old alchemical engravings.

In his most recent paintings, Nettles has gravitated toward texts that are more immediately legible on first glance, yet ultimately no less mysterious. Snippets of conversation torn from everyday life run from top to bottom in a font that recalls hand-stenciled shop signs; disjunctions and deliberate sidetracks are the mortar that holds them together. Phrases are stacked, clashed, amputated, and sometimes ripped apart and scattered chaotically. The resulting bits of quasi-proclamation and pseudo-communication are both sinister and amusing by turns, calling to mind the gentle snark of Ed Ruscha’s late-1970s word pastels: “drug allergy fake loiters just far enough from “radical wonton” to establish plausible deniability. Ghostly snippets of text murmur faintly in the background like a mildly sarcastic chorus, echoing, multiplying, and subverting surface meanings (is that “permit tonight” or “hermit night”?). Behind the chatter’s misdirection is the nagging sense of a deeper significance that awaits excavation and exegesis. Nettles’ works dare us to acknowledge the primal and sometimes neurotic need we have to make sense of it all, and the magical ability that language has to both fulfill and thwart that need.

Pictured: Darrell Nettles When You Look A t Me, 2014 Acrylic on canvas, 82″ x 60″

For further information, please contact 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel by phone at 1.917.701.3338, or by e-mail at info@532gallery.com


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Tomorrow-land

New Paintings by Julie Langsam

April 30 – May 30  2015

In her newest exhibition Tomorrow-land,  Julie Langsam presents structures built specifically for mid-20th century World’s Fair exhibitions: Philips Pavilion designed by Le Corbusier and Iannis Xenakis, the Tent of Tomorrow & Observation Towers by Philip Johnson and Habitat by Moshe Safdie. In choosing these structures Langsam brings an additional level of engagement to her ongoing exploration into how our ideals as a society are manifest in our collective culture.

In addition to the on-going ‘landscape’ series, Langsam continues to introduce new structures to her body of architectural scenes. Small brightly-colored paintings of floor plans assert the abstract qualities of the architectural blueprint, a two-dimensional depiction of a three-dimensional space. A large collaged floor piece made out of carpet depicts the floor plan of the Director’s Housedesigned by Walter Gropius in Dessau, Germany for the Bauhaus school. Color in these works is chosen through a random system.

In a series of drawings presented in a grid, walls are redacted and covered, [parts of buildings and the adjacent landscape] are replaced with a field of graphite gray. This [simultaneous veiling and overlay] conveys an absence, a void to be filled, but also embodies a curious push/pull effect: the graphic blocking and blotting out of surfaces serves as an intermediary screen that disrupts a structural coherence in reading these pictures. Gray squares, rectangles, trapezoids jump from drawing to drawing. While these images appear historically distant, they are also reanimated.

Langsam’s work playfully negotiates and questions the legacy of modernism on contemporary culture. Representations of toxic landscapes reference the painterly sublime, serving as the ground for modernist architectural marvels, structures that evoke notions of failed utopias. Her work is rendered in a curious flatness, where edges of iconic formalist, modernist paintings are flanked against photographic representations of the building.  For Langsam, the canon appears less as a ‘barricade to storm than a ruin to pick through. The works presented suggest an attempt to navigate multiple legacies at once negotiating personal memory with art historical and institutional history.

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IN NEW YORK

John A. Parks
New York Paintings
March 26 - 6 pm through April 25, 2015

Once again it is a great pleasure to exhibit new paintings by John Alexander Parks and most especially because he has recently been making paintings about New York, his adopted home for more than three decades.  For much of this time Parks has painted subjects that bear on English life using his vantage point as a British exile. Those pictures are often at once nostalgic and gently ironic.  Parks brings a new energy, lively wit and considerable poignancy to his very personal vision of New York.

A gifted colorist, sensitive draftsman and delightful handler of paint, Parks mixes whimsical humor and enormous sympathy for his subjects.  His works are inviting, accessible and entertaining but their full import can take time to sort out and fully savor.  They are the paintings of an artist who is thoroughly and wonderfully engaged with the world around him.

Although he has kept a modest profile as an artist Parks has accrued some serious critical acclaim over the years. Writing in the New York Times as long ago as 1982, the great critic John Russell described Parks as “…a true poet in paint and something of a find.” In December of 2012 Roberta Smith, the current chief art critic of the Times, described Parks’ painting as “…a treat to discover.”

Parks was born in Leeds, England in 1952, and studied at the Royal College of Art in London.  He has lived in and around New York since 1976 and was represented for many years by Allan Stone, the legendary art dealer and gallerist.  He is a member of the faculty of the School of Visual Arts in New York where he teaches drawing and painting.  He recently authored a general introduction to the world of art entitled “Universal Principles of Art,” Rockport Publishing, 2014. His work is in the collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, the Museum of the Rhode Island School of Design and many others.

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EN VOZ ALTA (ALOUD)

 

 

February 27 – March 21, 2015

Opening Reception, Thursday February 26, 6-8pm


Curated by Rachel Weingeist

We are pleased to present En Voz Alta (Aloud), an exhibition of works by twelve Cuban-born artists: María Magdalena Campos-Pons, Alberto Casado, Duvier del Dago, Meira Marrero & José Toirac, Liudmila & Nelson, Yunier Hernandez, Joseph Michael Lopez, Armando Mariño, Douglas Pérez Castro, Reynerio Tamayo, Carlos Rodríguez Cárdenas, and Elio Rodríguez – seven living in Havana, four in the United States and one in Europe.

The steady erosion of the United States embargo against Cuba, since 2009, has given hope to many there and abroad that normalization between the two countries is possible. On the island, opportunity, or the perception of it, are more plentiful than ever. Many Cubans are celebrating the potential bounty, hoping that electronic connectivity and open trade are now or soon will be within reach.

The educational system in Cuba has produced prolific and undeniable talent whose artwork is now being lauded by art critics, curators and collectors as the best-kept secret in the art market today. The process of passing on a lineage under the Cuban system of student to artist to professor is as persistent and durable as Cuban culture itself.

En Voz Alta “gives sudden voice to an easy coupling of artists,” according to Rachel Weingeist, the curator, who wanted to respond to “the emotions that Cuban artists are expressing – generated by the recent political shifts.”

Everyone wants to know what is next in Cuba’s future. Perhaps artist duo Meira Marrero and José Toirac’s tarot card deck, bound in leather of 24 cards, titled Profile, will shed light. This work is charged with symbols inspired by the iconic interview that resulted in One Hundred Hours with Fidel, the infamous tell-all in the words of the Revolutionary himself, published in 2006.

In this exhibition, as art often manifests, humor and the realities of daily routine are intertwined. All of the artists in this show are influenced by current and recent political events: Douglas Perez’s painting,  December 17th in the White House, refers to President Obama’s announcing the restoration of a diplomatic relationship with Cuba, and we witness Michelle and Barack Obama dancing on a banquet table, dishes flying in celebration. Duvier del Dago, well known for his light and string drawings, positions a larger-than-life nude Cubana at a podium set in a futuristic public square, orating to a raucous and fictional crowd. María Magdalena Campos-Pons, revered for her sensual imagery, offers Unspeakable Sorrow, a ceremonial black-on-black portrait of despair, loss and abandonment, a howl, in which the flowering Amaryllis is the only trace of life or color.

Rachel Weingeist is a contemporary curator and cultural advisor who has curated over twenty-five Cuban exhibitions that range in theme and scale. Over the last five years, Weingeist built the largest private Cuban art collection to date and created the first contemporary Cuban video archive, which has traveled widely. She is a member of the Harvard Cuban Studies Advisory Board and actively participates internationally in cultural and political dialogue.

Image: Duvier del Dago, The Story Belongs to the One Telling It, 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Paper 28 x 39 inches

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Life Signs

IRA RICHER
LIFE SIGNS 

January 17 – February 14, 2015

532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel presents an exhibition of work by Ira Richer.
Including recent paintings and earlier works in Formica that were shown at Nosei Gallery.

When describing the work Anthony Haden-Guest writes:

These pieces combine deft materiality and wit. As with the hammer, the magnet, the exclamation point, the scribbled title in “Gulf”. So too the paintings. Richer’s palette inclines to early summer and isn’t scared of black. Note the shadow in “The Yellow Cave”.  His line can be at once elegant and muscular as in the “Massage”Painting in a way reminiscent of early Hockney – and there’s nothing whatsoever wrong with that – but where Hockneys are purposefully allusive, something anecdotal, these are simply what they are. A fully-formed figure is often a presence, as dominant as in Munch or Dubuffet, but as with these artists, they are not borrowed from elsewhere. The picture-plane is the petri dish in which they exist. Nothing decorative, every form has meaning, but it is often enigmatic.

An engaging shape that is central to two canvases looks somewhat like a tuber or – it is pinkish – might it be a human organ? It doesn’t matter. Richer’s form happens to be based on a female figure, bending. Behind her, on one canvas is the table at which Cezanne’s card players are seated and the other seems to sport black shoes and gloves. Hamlet, toying with Polonius, says: Do you see yonder cloud that’s almost in shape of a camel? Decoding forms is a natural function of the brain.

So the paintings in the show look kind of radical in a period of when so much that floats its seemingly critic-proof way through the market looks strategic rather than felt. “When I think of Munch’s Scream. I think how lucky he was to have a pier to scream on above Oslo, by himself all alone.” Ira Richer says, “Man has become a species whose land is reduced to a table top. His existence is engineered and contorted by others. And the last indignity- is- we have to hold our smile”. I see fugitive signs that the times may be a-changing though.

These paintings are such signs of life.

Ira Richer studied at Cooper Union (BFA) and at Yale University (MFA). Ira is a Professor of Drawing and Advanced Painting at the School of Visual Arts, New York. His work is in the collection of the Vincent van Gogh Foundation Arles, France; the Bob Blackburn Collection/Smithsonian Institute; the J.Patrick Lannon Foundation; the Francisco Pellizzi collection; the collection of Lucien, Yolande and Ann Clergue among others.

The writer Anthony Haden-Guest has contributed to the Financial Times weekend column on art collecting, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, Paris Review, The New York Observer, Art Forum, Esquire UK .
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Shadowland

Diana Copperwhite

November 13 – January 10, 2015

When describing Diana Copperwhite’s work Colm Toibin wrote:

Her work is about painting first and foremost; [these] references merely serve a purpose.  Thus digital images which freeze and fragment an original image fascinate her, but such images in themselves are not enough, they provide a way into the painting.  It is their visuality which inspires rather than any precise sense of a blurred or fragmented reality.   Because she physically likes making paintings, everything is subservient to what paint will achieve.”

Copperwhite makes paintings that move fluidly between representation and abstraction. Photographs, montage and assemblage all aid the process and become ancillary works that pin down fleeting thoughts, glimpses and reactions to a media saturated age.  Her interests and sources are eclectic and wide ranging, from social media to philosophical debate to art historical references.  Yet, as Toibin points out, her paintings are no more about the image than they are about the process of painting itself.  Her work is phenomenological in that momentarily emotional responses override the need to capture reality.  Something has piqued her interest and from that initial interest she thinks in colour, in tone, and texture, in setting herself a visual problem to which there is no single definitive solution.  Her palette is composed of murky undertones punctuated by bright neon rifts. The fluidity and expressiveness of the painting gives little hint of the rigorous and formal abstract principles applied to the making.

Diana Copperwhite studied Fine Art Painting at Limerick School of Art and Design and the National College of Art and Design, Dublin. She completed an MFA at Winchestor School of Art, Barcelona in 2000.  Diana is a tutor at the National College of Art and Design,Dublin.  Her work is in the collection of the Irish Museum of Modern Art and the Arts Council of Ireland, and also in collections in the United States, Europe and Australia.

The writer Colm Toibin is currently Irene and Sidney B Silverman Professor of Humanities at Columbia University.  He is an IMPAC Dublin Literary Award prizewinner, and has appeared on the Booker shortlist, most recently in 2013 for his play the Testament of Mary.

 

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Twisted Figures

72 x 60, acrylic on canvas
Untitled (Golden Yellow) Acrylic on canvas, 72 x 60 inches

Ian Hughes
October 9 – November 8, 2014

Over the arc of his career, Ian Hughes has honed a distinctive visual language in which paint reveals its lushest and most viscous qualities while simultaneously giving shape to bio-reminiscent forms that have a compelling life of their own. In Twisted Figures, his third solo show at 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel, Hughes’s latest series of acrylic paintings pushes this language into a new phase in which the shapes on the canvases continue to self-confidently assert their own presence, yet begin to move beyond an earlier, more matter-of-fact reliance on organic and visceral associations.

Twisted Figures reflects a subtle turn in Hughes’s paintings toward motifs that are slightly more elusive in content, while retaining the beautiful but vaguely stomach-churning core of his earlier works. Many of the latest pieces feature the same intense, warm palette and pseudo-anatomical imagery set against flat monochromatic backgrounds, such as Green Ovals, which presents a smooth fleshlike surface against which brightly rendered rolling forms in pink, white, and orange suggest intestines, buttocks, and/or reproductive organs. Yet patches of textile-like patterning and a handful of amorphous shapes scattered throughout hint at a much wider range of associations, from soft pillows to eerie but strangely inviting otherworldly landscapes.

In some of the new paintings, Hughes sets up a tension between more organic, down-to-earth colors—such as the duller hamburger/flesh pink in Untitled (Taupe) —and contorted masses that are much harder to pin down. Still other canvases veer in the opposite direction by merging undulations of vivid, carnivalesque blues, pinks, oranges, or greens with somber dark swathes into curves that evoke chaotic balloon sculptures or failed attempts to wring order from unruly sausages of brute matter. In Untitled (Golden Yellow) and Red Wrap, the brushstrokes begin to assert themselves in a way that seems to subtly threaten the integrity of the forms they comprise, thereby highlighting the importance of paint as the essential substrate for Hughes’s cheerful-yet-disquieting images. The juxtaposition of painterly effects (rounded forms and illusionistic volumes) with more graphic elements (flat, opaque backgrounds and sharp edges) strongly reinforces this message. The result is a potent comment on the powerful tension between medium and image that has haunted painting for as long as abstraction has existed, or perhaps since the first images were daubed on a cave wall millennia ago.

For further information, please contact 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel by phone at 1.917.701.3338, or by e-mail at info@532gallery.com

 

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Imaginary Places

September 4 – October 4, 2014

 

532 Gallery is pleased to present new works by Marie-Dolma Chophel and Lennart Rieder.

Marie-Dolma Chophel’s works are inspired by topography and integrate 3D structures with organic forms and colors to form an abstract landscape of imaginary places.  She graduated from the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Beaux Arts de Paris, France.  Marie-Dolma’s work has been shown in the U.S., including recent exhibitions at the Fleming Museum and at the Dorsky Museum, and in London, Paris and Hong Kong. She lives and works in New York and Paris.

These 3D Grid Worlds Defy Space and Time

 

 

Lennart Rieder’s process oriented works touch on classic motifs and references in painting, placing them in a contemporary context.  His work has been shown at Parcours d’Artistes, Brussels; MFA ,Documenta Halle, Kassel; Coup de Ville, Sint Niklaas, Belgium; Strzelski Gallery, Stuttgart; Stellwerk Kassel, Kunstverein Familie Montez, Frankfurt; Habsburger Kunstverein, Hamburg.  Lennart lives in Kassel, Germany.

 

 

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New paintings after the long Winter

Armando Marino

May 8 – June 27, 2014

532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel is pleased to announce the second solo exhibition by contemporary Cuban artist Armando Mariño.

Composing a whimsical wintry mash up of abstract and figurative art to provide us all a rather philosophical light on the freedom of art, no matter what eye the perspective is derived from. “A work of art doesn’t have to be explained. If you do not have any feeling about this, I cannot explain it to you. If this doesn’t touch you, I have failed.” -Louise Bourgeois or perhaps more simply put, “Art for art’s sake” as best muttered by James McNeill Whistler, and as best served as Armando Mariño’s inspiration in his latest solo exhibition.

In the case of New Paintings After The Long Winter Mariño’s color moods range greatly, both portraying play on the exhibition’s title literally and figuratively. Gloomy colors with such depth within the strokes its almost impossible not to feel the arctic angst of Mariño’s artistic struggles. With that said, there are also many radiant colors that are rather jubilant, piercing through said New Paintings After The Long Winter like spring time. Mariño painted his pieces upon both large canvas and paper with oil paint, paper in his opinion allows him to dwell on the composition and subject more accurately. Paper gives him the opportunity to paint fast and keep up with the fast pace of his mind as he organizes colors and concepts.

His works are held in numerous public and private collections including: Deutsche Bank Collection, USA. 21C Museum Hotels, Kentucky. Coca Cola Foundation Spain. Shelly and Donald Rubin Private Collection, New York.

Armando Mariño (b. Santiago de Cuba) lives and works in New York.
Education: MFA Pedagogical Institute of Arts, Havana, Cuba and Rijksakademie of beeldende Kunsten, Amsterdam, Holland

Marino’s work is included in these current exhibitions:
Post Picasso-Contemporary Reactions, Museu Picasso, Barcelona, Spain
Without Masks: Contemporary Afro Cuban Art, The von Christierson Collection /Watch Hill Foundation
Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Canada

 

 

 

 

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meet me in the trees

Tanja Selzer

through April 26, 2014

Ticklish motifs await us in Selzer’s current series Meet me in the trees. Following on the heels of Sabotage, No Tears for the Creatures of the Night, Mind Candy and Cadavre Exquis, we find barely dressed and nude figures in the bushes. This is actually a classical motif in art history, and an extensively exhibited sujet with prominent progenitors such as Botticelli and Rubens and Manet and Cézanne and Picasso—and many many more. To be fair, we ought to mention Paula Modersohn-Becker as well: the very artist who, in 1906, painted the first nude self-portrait. These days we believe we’ve seen everything. But Tanja Selzer would not be Tanja Selzer, had she not succeeded in breathing new and vibrant life into this otherwise hackneyed theme. In view of her new works, it appears as if  Selzer conceives of the term “nude” (in German Akt) in its original sense as something derived from the concepts of “actus”—thus gesticulation—and of “agere”—which means “to set in motion”.

Her motifs are screenshots from the internet’s worldwide photo album. Outdoor moments that could have taken place anywhere. Scarcely compromising, when you see them on your computer screen. On the other hand, these paintings are not only of considerable size; they also show the bodies in a field of color that appears frightening and irrational, yet simultaneously pleasurable thanks to the way it’s been ecstatically painted. There is something absurd about the manner in which these skin-toned forms have strayed into this ineffable world of colorful abstractions. And it is precisely this contradiction that piques our curiosity and challenges us. At close glance the ecstasy is even more visible and palpable. Thus the forms in the back- and foreground—the shadows of the people and of the bushes, the colors of clothing and plants—all blend together in a floral-vegetable act of love. The love-play is an immediate and an intimate one, befitting the moment depicted and the detail chosen by the artist from the plenitude of materials available to her. Selzer’s subtle painting techniques have been adapted to suit the theme portrayed here. Powerful, richly contrastive strokes alternate with gentle rhythmic glazing. Withexceptional dramaturgical skill the artist guides the gaze of the spectator across the diversity of skillfully and picturesquely staged scenes towards a putative highpoint. The highpoint itself remains vague. As is often the case, it is up to us to imagine more fully in our fantasy the scene depicted, and to enjoy it for what it is—a painted canvas, but painted in an exceedingly pleasurable manner.

With her new series,  Selzer alludes back to the early history of the nude— age when the nude had yet to be rarefied religiously and morally, but instead paid homage, first and foremost, to the cult of fertility. Thus, in the works of her current series Meet me in the trees, Selzer not only probes the depths of the laws of painting in an exceptionally adept fashion, but also plays with the strange attitudes of a society that is apparently forced to withdraw back into the bushes, wearied by the sheer surfeit of virtual pornography.

Text: Harald Krämer
Translation: Brian Poole

 

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Paintings and Sculpture

  
through February 15

PEGGY BATES
TATJANA BUSCH
MARCY BRAFMAN
KYLIE HEIDENHEIMER
IAN HUGHES
ILIYAN IVANOV
PACO MARCIAL
REGINE MUELLER WALDECK
JOHN PARKS
LENNART RIEDER
ELIO RODRIGUEZ
JASON RHOADES
HENDRIK SMIT

 

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Zero Gravity

NADJA MARCIN Zero Gravity

through December 19th, 2013

532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel is proud to present the first U.S. solo show of performance artist Nadja Verena Marcin. This exhibition is held concurrently with the landmark fifth biennial of PERFORMA in New York City.

A highlight of the show will be the world premiere of Triple F, a video of a turbulent future society where the relationships of mind and body are out of control. Inspired by the 1976 science-fiction cult film Logan’s Run, Triple F explores a world ruled by three women through their thoughts. It was shot in Germany at the neo-Renaissance Rheda castle, ’70s shopping mall Marler Stern, and historical brewery Dortmunder U. Its production was supported by Film and Media Foundation NRW, Düsseldorf.

The 532 Gallery show will also feature Zero Gravity, a stunning piece of performance art that imaginatively combines art and science. Floating weightless in a plane over Florida, Marcin revisits Friedrich Nietzsche’s Die Fröhliche Wissenschaft, going beyond the assertion that ”God is dead” to explore the deep emotional quality of the text: “What were we doing when we unchained this earth from its sun? Whither is it moving now? Whither are we moving? Away from all suns? Are we not plunging continually? Backward, sideward, forward in any direction? Are we not straying as through an infinite nothing?” Zero Gravity is a work of art that takes the audience to a new level of consciousness of both body and mind. It is sponsored by Aurora Aerospace, Florida,and WARP, Belgium.

Born in Germany, Marcin received her MFA from Columbia University, New York after graduating with honors from Academy of Fine Arts, Münster. Marcin’s creations are exhibited in museums, art spaces/galleries and distinguished collections worldwide. Her work has been selected for grants, global biennials and film festivals, including: Middle Gate Geel ‘13, Belgium, Kunsthuis Yellow Art, 2013; Coup de Ville, 2013 Belgium; VOLTA9, Basel, Switzerland 2013; Hudson Valley Contemporary Art Center, 2013; ZKM- Museum for Art and Media, 2012;  DAAD, New York, 2011;’Qui Vive?’ Moscow International Biennale for Young Art, Moscow MOMA, 2010; ARTWORKinternational, Inc. Grant, 2010; Salon/Screening, ICA Philadelphia, 2010; Uncontrollable Flesh, Berkley Art Museum, 2010; Short-Term Deviation, Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, New York; Kaunas Biennale, National Museum, 2009; Videonale 11& 10, Kunstmuseum, Bonn; Mediations Biennale, Poznan, 2008; Models of Self-Reflection, AZKM, Muenster, 2008; FIFA-Festival pour Film sur L’Art, Montreal, 2008; EJECT-Ex teresa arte actual, Mexico City; Fulbright Award, 2007; and Jumpnights, Ludwig Museum, Cologne, 2007

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Loose Ends

DIANA COPPERWHITE
September 10 – October 19, 2013

We are pleased to announce Diana Copperwhite’s first US solo show in collaboration with Kevin Kavanagh Gallery, Dublin.  This follows on from her succesful solo presentation at VOLTA NY earlier this year, and her residency at the Josef Albers Foundation in December 2012.

“Whose afraid of Red, Yellow and Blue” asked Barnett Newman in the sixties amid the era’s monikers of post-painterly abstraction and colour field painting.  His answer, and indeed the answers of his compatriots at the time, seem to us now as stately as they are staid.   They sit comfortably into the art historical narrative -the progressive imperative of Modernism.  The paintings of Diana Copperwhite deliver us back into the maelstrom of colour resurrecting the fear that such charged tints and hues can conjure. Copperwhite’s colours misbehave, taunting and mocking our narrow appreciation of their emotional potential”.
-Patrick T. Murphy, Director of Royal Hibernian Academy Dublin.
Former Director of the Institute of Contemporary Art, at the University of Pennsylvania.

“Diana Copperwhite constantly mentions  a musical logic and a sense of musical notation and tonality as she describes the act of painting. But, on the other hand, she insists that she does not pre-structure, that she allows one colour to suggest another, that the element of gesture and chance is essential as is the flash of insight and the swift ability then to structure it, to carry it out.”

Colm Tóibín

Diana Copperwhite (b. 1969, Ireland) lives and works in Dublin.  In 2012 she was a resident artist at the Josef Albers Foundation Connecticut, USA.  She was a finalist in the Guasch Coranty Fundacio Painting Prize, Centre Cultural Metropolita Tecia Sala, Barcelona (2008) and was winner of the AIB Art Prize (2007).  Her work is in public collections including: Irish Museum of Modern Art, Arts Council of Ireland, Limerick City Gallery of Art, Office of Public Works, Contemporary Irish Art Society, Mariehamn Stadbiblioteque, International Red Cross Netherlands, and private collections in the USA, Australia and Europe.
Recent shows include;  Painting Now, Ron Mandos,Amsterdam (2012), Into the Light:The Arts Council of Ireland, Crawford Gallery, Cork (2012); Diana Cooperwhite, Anna Bjerger and Oliver Comerford, Kevin Kavanagh, Dublin (2012); Making Familiar, Temple Bar Gallery, Dublin (2012); The Mind was Dreaming, the world was its Dream, Diana Copperwhite, Michael Kalmbach & Hiraki Sawa, Solstice Art Centre, Navan (2012); An Island from the day before, Kevin Kavanagh, Dublin (2011); The Fold, Visual Centre for Contemporary Art, Carlow (2011); Collecting the New: Recent Acquisitions to the IMMA Collection, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2010); and eclipse of a title, Centre Culturel Irlandais, Paris (2009).
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Between Villages

Gerard Ellis

May 30 – July 11, 2013

A painter and draftsman by calling and choice, Gerard Ellis establishes an interesting dichotomy between the practice of painting and social critique. His pictorial work is highly expressive and vigorous for those who directly or indirectly participate in the multiple strata of the contexts of which this artist speaks. The violence, corruption and lack of willpower characteristic of our times are central topics of his meticulous pictorial work. There is a studied connection and interdependence between what is his work and what constitutes his life experiences, which translates into a certain underlying politicization of life’s experience. Self-referential and sometimes autobiographical, his dynamic yet intensely personal and authentic compositions serve on dual levels; not only are they effective in presenting the viewer with truncated iconoclastic narratives, but they also possess a strong visual vocabulary of technical styles.

 

Ellis competes in a direct relation to the animal, this time, no longer domestic (an owl, a cybor-dog, among others) with the man and are constant companions to the figures in the paintings. Equipped with a dramatic quality, the plastic movement of each one of the works speaks of speed and stillness, paralysis and aggression, being the diachronic dichotomy of the mental movement of the spectator.

Born in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic in 1976, he graduated from the National School of Fine Arts and the Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo. Selected to be part of the “S-Files”, the 6th edition of the El Museo del Barrio Biennial in NY, 2011. Has been recognized with three awards of Excellence by The Society of News Design, 2007-2008. In 2007 was invited to be part of the IX edition of the Cuenca International Biennial, Ecuador. His work has been exhibited in group shows in the Nassau County Museum of Art, NY, The IDB Cultural Center and The Mexican Cultural Institute in Washington, D.C. Selected to be part of the National Biennial of Visual Arts and the XX edition of the E. León Jimenes Art Contest (Biennial), where he received the Prize for painting, both in the Dominican Republic. He participated in the “Sarmiento Public Art Project, 2007” in public areas of the city of Santo Domingo.

International contemporary art fairs include: VOLTA NY, Scope, Pinta and Arte BA.  His work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach, CA;  Fundación para la Pintura, Canaria, Spain; the Museum of Contemporary Drawing and the Museum of Modern Art in Santo Domingo;  The Dominican Congress and in private collections in New York, London, Miami, Spain, Panamá, Venezuela, Puerto Rico and Santo Domingo.

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Now(here)

through May 25th

Julie Langsam

This exhibition features several recent paintings from Langsam’s long-running series of banded montages that set nearly monochromatic, tightly rendered views of iconic modernist buildings on top of a band of gridded abstract motifs inspired by classic modernist paintings and beneath ominously lit skies that invoke Romantic landscape painting.  The skies are, in fact, loose renderings (rather than transcriptions) of skies from Hudson River landscape painting, but they also uncannily recall the pre-Romantic Baroque skies of Giovanni Lanfranco (1582-1647), who himself anticipated Goya in his St. Augustine cycle.  This circuitous route of painterly iconography underscores Langsam’s own “passion” for painting and Modernism, where even Romanticism is revealed to be a construct with foundations appearing close to two centuries earlier than what is held to be its historical moment.

The three spaces in her paintings are thematically linked and illusionistically self-cancelling.  The “landscape” is pure design, the “photographic” Corbusier or Neutra house refuses to be illuminated by either the pattern below or the ominous atmosphere above.  Langsam has described this conflicted space as a “ ‘nowhere’ – which can only exist in the fiction/reality of painting.” For Langsam, this “nowhere” is symptomatic of our desire for unrealizable sublimities proposed by Modernist ideals.  At the same time, she regards herself as just a susceptible to these same desires.  A lapsing Modernist, Langsam trades a narrow purity for enriching irony, while refusing to relinquish an ambition for a formal beauty and movement. Painting, for Langsam is a visual site for negotiating with her faith and disappointment.  Like a good nouveau realisme film, her paintings are funny, sad, and grand.

Stephen Westfall

Above: Le Corbusier Landscape (Villa Stein)
Oil on canvas 72″x96″

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Fusion

February 21 – March 30, 2013

 Tatjana Busch, “Fusion“ a synthesis of objects with light, sound, color and motion.

“It could be like this and it could also be like that…,” says Tatjana Busch. But not until we see her latest works in this exhibition, does her meaning become truly accessible. Conceptually, her earliest works appear even more tightly regulated by the obvious influences of the strict, geometric, coloured forms we know from the Bauhaus and Russian Suprematists. Their intuitive shapes continue to spring from Busch’s innermost world, just as they did years ago. Permeating her entire body, they are finally given material form in the outside world by her hands, seeming more carefully planned than they actually are. Her latest works, however, appear to break with any dependence whatsoever on art history. They free themselves even from the shackles of physics and burst forth into freedom and openness – a freedom and openness to which the observer must surrender himself if he is to appre- ciate the true dimensions of these works.

The light installation “Fusion” invites us to broaden our consciousness. It abducts us into a fully-fledged show that immerses the observer into a real-time synthesis of light, form, colour, sound and movement – a synthesis in which the observer loses himself, dissolving, then ultimately uniting with the artwork itself to create a common, new cos- mos.

Initially this bent, folded, silver-shining sculpture named “Fusion” consists merely of outer forms. But it also harbours an inner, hidden form, one that might be referred to as its “inner potential”. This reaches far beyond the visible. It is the energy, the attraction of this artwork, whose extended reach commands the space around it and seeks even to stretch beyond it. The extent of this becomes apparent through the movement of the rays of light that meet its sur- face and create dynamic light-paintings, light-clouds and light-worlds. As they do so, these rays consistently extend, modify and distort the sculpture’s external form. What had initially seemed so static and immutable is sounding out new frontiers all the time, revealing forms that flow and stream. The outer space suddenly consumes the observer, engulfing him to make him part of the artwork itself. The void is no longer a void. Everything hangs together, merges.

Although essentially two-dimensional, the “Goldbubble” and “Hushbubble” videos trick the observer into seeing three-dimensional, dancing, reflecting water worlds. Penetrated by magical clouds of energy, these are immersed in the meditative sound-worlds of composer and former Passport bass guitarist Wolfgang Schmid – worlds inhabited by light orbits and other light creati- ons before they sink into the depths of a planetary universe, worlds which at the same time echo the holistic notion to represent the depths of one’s own inner world.

And finally there are the Snapshots. Created from such kaleidoscopic movements, these still-life photographs of “Fu- sion”, “Goldbubble” and “Hushbubble” would have the observer believe that the ‘Now’ can be captured, that the eternal flow of time and spread of space can be halted.

But can they really? Could this be the way things are? Or could they equally well be different?

Our hopes for a conclusive answer to these questions will be in vain. With their claim to absolute freedom, these works categorically exclude any such possibility. After all, it is freedom that tells us things could be the way they are, but that they could equally well be different. The observer is left completely to his own devices.
Text: Kat Schütz, Sarasota
Translation: Melanie Gridlestone, Munich

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532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel | Phone 917.701.3338 | info@532gallery.com | 532 West 25th Street NY 10001 Tuesday - Friday 11-6pm, Sat 12-6pm Follow 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel on Artsy